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Grenades

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INERT DEACTIVATED. Scarce WW2 Japanese Type 4 Ceramic Fragmentation Hand Grenade. - O 2073
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a scarce WW2 Japanese Type 4 hand grenade, commonly known as the Ceramic Grenade that were made at the latter stages of WW2 (late 1944 onwards) by the Japanese due to a shortage of raw materials. The grenades were made from white terra cotta and are glazed with various colours including a very dark brown, tan, cream, white and a clear glaze. When these grenades detonated they fragmented into sharp chards of ceramic being just as effective as a normal cast iron hand grenade. This grenade has a dark chocolate brown coloured ceramic glaze to the body. There is no damage to the grenade or any cracks in the body. No licence is required to possess this inert grenade in the UK if retained as a part of a collection or display. Price includes UK delivery. O 2073
£275.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. WW2, 1941 Dated, British No 68 AT Mk III (Anti Tank) HEAT (High Explosive Anti-Tank) Fin Stabilised Hollow Charged Rifle Grenade. Sn - 21303
INERT DEACTIVATED. The grenade, Rifle No. 68 AT was a British anti-tank rifle grenade used during WW2. The No. 68 was an early form of shaped charge grenade, and has some claim to have been the first High Explosive, Anti-Tank (HEAT) device in use. The design of the warhead was simple and was capable of penetrating 52mm (2 inches) of armour in 1940. The fuse of the grenade was armed by removing a pin in the tail which prevented the firing pin from flying forward. The grenade was launched from a rifle cup. The four fins gave it some stability in the air and, provided the grenade hit the target at the proper angle (90 degrees), the charge would be effective. The detonation occurred on impact, when a striker in the tail of the grenade overcame the resistance of a creep spring and was thrown forward into a stab detonator. The grenade is fired from the rifle via a No. 1 Mk.1 rifle bomb discharger cup that fits at the muzzle end of the rifle. This is a rare original WW2, 1941 dated HEAT (High Explosive Anti-Tank) hollow charged No. 68 MK III AT rifle grenade. The grenade is made of die cast alloy with a die cat alloy gas check on the rear. Two of the fins have cast into them No 68 AT III 1941 (1941 date). The base of the body has the makers mark RMLC cast into it. The 68 anti-tank rifle grenade was displaced later in WW2 by improved weapons including the PIAT and other weapons. See ‘GRENADE’ British & Commonwealth Hand & Rifle Grenades, pages 151 – 154 by Rick Landers. The price includes UK delivery and no licence is required to possess this inert grenade in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 21303
£245.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. Rare WW2, Home Guard, Quarter Sectioned Instructional, 1941 Dated, British No.68 AT (Anti Tank) HEAT (High Explosive Anti-Tank) Fin Stabilised Hollow Charged Rifle Grenade. Sn - 21304
INERT DEACTIVATED. The grenade, Rifle No. 68 /AT was a British anti-tank rifle grenade used during WW2.The No. 68 was an early form of shaped charge grenade, and has some claim to have been the first High Explosive, Anti-Tank (HEAT) device in use. The design of the warhead was simple and was capable of penetrating 52mm (2 inches) of armour in 1940. The fuse of the grenade was armed by removing a pin in the tail which prevented the firing pin from flying forward. The grenade was launched from a rifle cup. The four fins gave it some stability in the air and, provided the grenade hit the target at the proper angle (90 degrees), the charge would be effective. The detonation occurred on impact, when a striker in the tail of the grenade overcame the resistance of a creep spring and was thrown forward into a stab detonator. The grenade is fired from the rifle via a No. 1 Mk.1 rifle bomb discharger cup that fits at the muzzle end of the rifle. This is a rare original British home Guard instructional WW2 HEAT (High Explosive Anti-Tank) hollow charged No. 68 MK III AT rifle grenade with a quarter section taken out to reveal the grenades inner workings. The grenade is made of die cast alloy with a steel screw on nose cap with a brass washer. The steel gas check is stamped REVO 1941 (1941 date) with a crowfoot in a diamond and is secured to the rear by a brass screw. One of the fins of the tail unit has been removed to reveal the firing pin and creep spring assembly. Two of the other fins have cast into them 68 AT III 1941 (1941 date) and a makers monogram BDC. The grenades firing pin assembly is complete and the explosive contents are simulated with a painted inert filling. This filling has an inert.410 brass cartridge case in it above the firing pin. The 68 anti-tank rifle grenade was displaced later in WW2 by improved weapons including the PIAT and other weapons. There is a contemporary photograph shows a member of the Home Guard with a rifle equipped to fire a No68 anti-tank grenade at Dorking, 3 August 1942. See ‘GRENADE’ British & Commonwealth Hand & Rifle Grenades, pages 151 – 154 by Rick Landers. The price includes UK delivery and no licence is required to possess this inert grenade in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 21304
£295.00

DEACTIVATED INERT. WW2 1940 Dated, British, DRILL, No.69 I Bakelite Hand Grenade By DLR (Thomas De La Rue London) With All-Ways Weighted Fuse Tape. - O 2070
DEACTIVATED INERT. The British No 69 was a hand grenade developed and used during World War II. It was adopted into service due to the need for a grenade with smaller destructive radius than the No 36M Mills grenade. This allowed the thrower to use a grenade even when there was little in the way of defensive cover. In contrast, the much greater destructive radius of the Mills bomb than its throwing range forced users to choose their throwing point carefully, in order to ensure that they would not be wounded by their own grenade. The shell of the No 69 grenade is composed entirely of the hard plastic, Bakelite, which shattered without producing fragments like a metal bodied grenade. Metal fragmenting sleeves were available to increase the grenade's lethality. Using the No 69 bomb was very simple: the screw-off cap was removed and discarded, and the grenade was then thrown. When the grenade was thrown, a linen tape with a curved lead weight on the end automatically unwrapped in flight, freeing a ball-bearing inside the fuse. In this manner the all-ways fuse was armed in flight and the grenade exploded on impact and like the Gammon grenade, which used the same fuse design, it was withdrawn from service soon after the Second World War ended. This is an excellent original WW2, 1940 dated No.69 I DRILL hand grenade. It has the correct Bakelite body with screw off cap and all-ways weighted fuse cord. The grenade retains most of its original white painted finish and is stenciled in black near the base DRILL. The base of the grenade is embossed No.69 I and D.L.R.-40 (No, 69 grenade mark 1, Thomas De La Rue London, 1940 date). the grenade is fitted with a dummy screw out primer holder and a white dummy fuze to practice fuzing the hand grenade. The top of its screw off cap is embossed 247 MK II (No 247 mark 2 allways fuse). The inside of the cap is embossed K36. Under the screw off top is the metal weighted fly of tape. See pages 155 - 157 in ‘GRENADE’ British & Commonwealth Hand & Rifle Grenades by Rick Landers. No licence is required to possess this grenade in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Price includes UK delivery. O 2070
£275.00

**SOLD LAYAWAY 2/1**INERT DEACTIVATED. WW2, , German 81 cm, High Explosive (HE) Mortar Round for the 8 cm Granatwerfer 34 (8 cm GrW 34).**SOLD** - O 2069
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a WW2, German 81cm high explosive mortar 8 cm Granatwerfer 34 (8 cm GrW 34). The cast iron mortar body retains some of its worn red painted finish and has cast into it round the lkx – 62 54 and is fitted with a brown bakelite impact fuse which is impressed 41-53 M ZFJ. The tail fins are made of pressed steel spot welded to the body. The price includes UK delivery and no licence is required to possess this inert mortor in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. O 2069
£0.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. Unfired, American, Korean War Era, 1947, 4.2 Inch M335 Illumination Mortar & Fuze. - O 2068
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is an unfired Korean War Era, American 4.2 inch illumination mortor. The mortors body is made of steel with a copper driving band. The mortor has no stabilising fins and instead has copper driving band which engages in rifling in the mortor to give the projectile spin stabilisation. The mortor retains all of its original light grey painted finish and is stamped on the side 4.2 IN M335. The brass and alloy nose fuze is stamped round its circumference LOS EGE – 3A DOPPZ DM53 FUZE MT SQ. The price includes UK delivery and no licence is required to possess this round in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. O 2068
£395.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. MINT, Unfired, American, Korean War Era, 1947 dated, 4.2 Inch Quarter Sectioned M329 High Explosive (HE) Mortar & Fuze. - O 2067
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a mint Korean War Era, 1947 dated unfired American 4.2 inch high explosive mortor with a quarter section taken out of it to show the internal workings of it. The mortors body is made of steel with a copper driving band. The mortor has no stabilising fins and instead has copper driving band which engages in rifling in the mortor to give the projectile spin stabilisation. The mortor retains all of its original painted finish which is olive green and is stencilled in yellow on the side M 329 TNT 4.2 IN-M W/SUPL.CHG AMM LOT 10P 2-47 (February 1947 date) SECT. The brass and steel nose fuze is stamped round its circumference DDM 51A5 .05 SEC BW/ES/62. The fuze is also stencilled at the top INERT and has a white painted top. The price includes UK delivery and no licence is required to possess this round in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. O 2067
£495.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. British, 1956 Dated 2” Proof Mortor. - O 2064
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a rare and original British, 1956 dated 2inch Proof mortor which was used to proof 2 inch mortor barrels. The mortor retains most of its original black painted finish (Proof) and is made out of a turned solid steel 2 inch diameter body with a tubular tail section secured to the body by a screw. This tail section is ventilated for the firing cartridge. The body of the mortor is stamped round its circumference 2LB 15OZS 2MOR1 11/56 (November 1956 date), a crowfoot and 2 manufacturers marks. The base of the tail assembly has an alloy safety cap which is embossed CRB on one side and 42 (1942 date) on the other. Due to the nature of a proof round, there are no stabilising fins. The price includes UK delivery and no licence is required to possess this inert mortor in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. O 2064
£175.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. Unfired, British, L49A1 Practice Tracer Carl Gustaf 84mm Anti-Tank Round. - O 2063
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is an unfired British 84mm Carl Gustaf recoilless rifle L49A1 practice tracer round which was named after Carl Gustafs Stads Gevärsfaktori who initially produced it the rifle. The weapon is a shoulder-fired recoilless rifle, initially developed by the Royal Swedish Army Materiel Administration during the second half of the 1940s as a close-range anti-tank and support weapon for infantry. The rifle is a lightweight, low-cost weapon that uses a wide range of ammunition, which makes it extremely flexible and suitable for a wide variety of roles. Development of the initial model started from 1946 as one of the many recoilless rifle designs of that era and was in service from 1948. The weapon was in service with the British Army from 1962 and is still used in updated versions. This is a Drill L50A1 84mm Carl Gustaf round commonly called the Charlie G in the British Army and consists of an black anodised alloy cartridge case has a blow out base and is stencilled in white round its circumference FFV 0584035 PRAC A TK L49A1 . The projectile is anodised mid blue round its middle for practice and is stencilled round its circumference in white 84mm INF PRAC ATK SX 404 GF HE SUB T. 257 CY (RoF Chorley) 6/81 (June 1981 date). The top part of the projectile is made of brown anodised steel and the bottom part is anodised grey alloy. The price includes UK delivery and no licence is required to possess this inert round in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. O 2063
£195.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. BL755 Anti-Tank & Runway Cratering Bomblet. - O 2061
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a British BL755 anti-tank and runway cratering hollow charge training bomblet. The weapon was used by the Royal Air Force in the Falklands, Bosnia and both Gulf Wars. The BL 755 bomblet was developed by Hunting aircraft and entered service with the Royal Air Force in 1973. The BL 755 was a hollow charge sub-munition with the weapons container weighed 600 pounds. The container held 147 of these sub munitions. The sub-munitions consisted of a small high explosive anti-tank warhead with a stabilizing coronet that flipped out on ejection to ensure they were facing forward when they impacted. The trigger was mounted on a spring that extended forward after launch to ensure the bomb fired at the right range from the armour or concrete runway surface. This is an unfired BL 755 bomblet body complete with its hollow charge cone and alloy fin holding tail assembly. This is an army Explosive Ordnance Department training bomblet and is stencilled WAD/EOD/7 inside the copper colour hollow charge. The grey painted body is stencilled in white round the body EXERCISE under a monogram of A*-2. The top of the body has a 6mm red painted ring under the cone. The weapon was used by the Hawker Harrier G.R. 3, Jaguar G,R.1, Blackburn Buccaneer S.2 and the Phantom F.4. The price includes UK delivery and no licence is required to possess this inert item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. O 2061
£275.00
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