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All Other Daggers and Knives

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Victorian Era Japanese Tanto With Ornate Brass Covered Wood Hilt & Ornate Brass Covered Wood Scabbard. Sn 17775:12 - 17775:12
This Japanese Tanto was made sometime in the Victorian era and is most likely an export piece. The cutting edge of the steel blade is 8”. The balde has staining consistent with age. It has a brass habaki and finger guard. It measures 13” overall length. Its hilt and scabbard are wood covered with brass which has ornate decoration (illustrated in the images). One side of the hilt has a small copper badge / device. The brass has some minor dents and staining consistent with age. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 17775:12
£295.00

Late Victorian/ Edwardian Era Bali / Indonesian Native Kris Dagger With Antique Ivory Hilt, Hand Forged Acid Wash Blade, Antique Ivory Scabbard & Antique Ivory Chop Sticks / Hair Tools Mounted On Period Hand Carved Grotesque Murti Vengeful God Stand. - 17740
The Kris is a type of dagger, traditionally worn as a status symbol and carried by warriors. These daggers were said to have originated in Java in the 14th Century but were adopted in all parts of the Archipelago with broad variations between the islands of Bali, Java & Sumatra. The Kris is characterised by its distinctive wavy blade (see 383 to 393 of ‘A Glossary Of The Construction Decoration & Use Of Arms & Armour by Stone where many variants of Kris are described and illustrated). Often these daggers were mounted on carved wood Kris stands in the form of dancers or Grotesque Murti God figures for display in homes and temples (examples of these stands, two with similar grotesque faces as ours are illustrated on page 393 of Stone’s book). The blade of the Kris dagger is given its characteristic shape by folding different types of metal together and then washing it in acid. Kris were often infused with arsenic to add colour / brightness during their forging but the method of doing this was a closely guarded secret among Smiths. This is an excellent Bali / Indonesian Kris made in the late 1800's -Early 1900's. It has a 13 ½” long acid washed, hand forged Kris blade which incorporates its ornate barbed design at the hand guard. The antique ivory hilt is hand carved with typical stylised birds head form and it has an ornate copper or brass ferrule. The dagger measures 16” overall and is complete with its original antique ivory scabbard which has metal bands. The Kris is accompanied by 2 period antique ivory chop sticks / hair tools which are each 7 ¾” length. All are mounted on their original period Kris stand. Hand carved from tropical hardwood and painted in vivid red, white, green black and gold colours the full body sculpture of a kneeling Grotesque figure with ornate ceremonial crown, armour & war like face is typical of Murti vengeful / protective God sculptures seen in Bali / Indonesia. The stand measures 21” tall and the base width is 9 ½” diameter. The base is covered in red felt. One clenched fist of the sculpture is holed to fit the Kris in its scabbard and chop sticks / hair tools. The price for this highly decorative ethnic piece includes UK delivery. Sn 17740
£975.00

Ancient Hand Forged Tanto Blade C1680’s- 1730’s Smith Signed ‘BUSHU SHITAHARA JU HIRO SHIGE’ Nara School Work Japanese Tanto With C1880’s Mounts, Scabbard, Ko-Gatana Short Knife & Expert Assessment Notes. Sn 17652 - 17652
An ancient Japanese Tanto blade in later mounts. The piece has been assessed by UK Japanese sword expert Bill Tagg. A copy of his hand written notes and drawing of the blade accompany the sword. In extracts from his notes he states “The blade has a cutting edge of 12”. The blade is ascribed Signed ‘BUSHU SHITAHARA JU HIRO SHIGE’. There were 7 Generations of Hiro Shige in Musashi province working from 1624-1860. The first 2 well rated. Possibly 2nd Generation. There were also several other Smiths using the family name or title ‘Shitahara’. It would take a Japanese expert to work out which man made this. Hamon temper line is Suguha Straight. Difficult to see not in polish. Looks like Nie crystals to edge structure Jihada. To scratched and with fine old rust on surface obscuring the beauty of the forging. Otherwise looks healthy only tiny nibble on edge. A couple of small bends on back edge. Saya is 19th Century with a design of Chidori birds and Bamboo worked in different colour lacquer. Tsuba is rounded square in iron with carved bugs & plants C1800. Possibly Nara school work. Tsuka is missing binding & Menuki ornaments. Fuchi is cast silver metal worked with Rabbit theme circa 1880’s when this Tanto was put together for export sale from Japan. Been a reasonable quality item in its day. Ko-Gatana is 20th century replacement, needs good 19th century By-Knife. Tanto needing Polishing & Re-bind to complete”. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 17652
£895.00

Malayan Kris and Scabbard. ED 2520 - ED 2520
This is a nice Malayan Kris measuring just over 17 inches in length with a blade length of 13 inches. The pistol style handle is made of wood and is carved on the inner surface. The blade is the characteristic wavy shape which is given its style and shape by folding different metals and then washing it in acid. The scabbard is made of hardwood, covered in a thin sheet of brass with a nice shaped mouth piece. This Kris can probably be dated to the late 19th century. The price includes U.K. delivery. ED 2520
£195.00

Large 19th Century Corsican Vendetta Folding Knife. ED 2518 - ED 2518
This is a nice Corsican Vendetta folding knife with an etched blade and decorated bone scales. The blade has the motto ‘VENDETTA CORSA’ ( Continuing revenge) on one side and ‘CHE LA MIA FERITA SIA MORTALE’ (may your wounds be mortal) on the other side. Both of these inscriptions are word but legible. The bone scales are decorated with a moors head and Corsica, the moors head being the symbol of the island and flowers and an eagle. These knives were made by rural blade makers from the1700s but evolved into a weapon of choice to settle family feuds. The vendetta code meant that if your family’s honour was insulted you were honour bound to; take action by one of the 3 S’s (ie. Schiopetto-gun, Stiletto-knife or Strada-street, meaning to run away. The knife measures 10 ¾ inches open and 5 7/8 inches closed This is a good early vendetta knife in excellent condition. The price includes U.K. delivery. ED 2518
£295.00

Italian WW2 Fighting Knife. ED 2517 - ED 2517
This is an Italian WW2 fighting knife. The grips are of wood, slightly contoured to fit the hand. The knife has an 8 inch single edged blade with a short top false edge. The knife is similar to the Austro-Hungarian version of WW1. The scabbard is made of steel and is the second style with a sloping belt loop as carried on the 2nd pattern MSVN dagger. This is a nice clean example of a WW2 Italian fighting knife. See Fighting Knives by Fred Stephens, item 376 and 377 on page 75. The price includes UK delivery. ED 2517
£395.00

Indian WW2 Era Kukri And Scabbard. ED 2514 - ED 2514
This is a good condition WW2 era Gurkha Kukri. The kukri is stamped on the blade with MILITARY SUPPLY SINDICATE BY NEIGATE. The kukri has a wood and brass mounted handle and it is contained in its black leather scabbard with a plated chape. There are 2 small skinning knives in the mouthpiece. The price includes U.K. delivery. ED 2514
£245.00

Victorian Era North West Frontier Pesh-Kabz Choora / Khyber Afghan Armour Piercing Knife With Ornately Tooled Hilt, Polished Bone & Horn Sectioned Grips & Scabbard. Sn 17427:7 - 17427:7
The Pesh-Kabz or Choora is a type of Perso-Afghan knife designed to penetrate chain mail armour (see page 494 of Stone's book 'A Glossary Of Arms & Armour'). The knives were typically used as a thrusting weapon, however, the wide ‘T’ section blade also possesses considerable slicing performance, and as such may also be used effectively with slashing or cutting strokes. During the British Colonial rule in India, the British frequently referred to all Afghan blades of this pattern collectively as "Afghan knives" or "Khyber knives", after the Khyber Pass that marked the transition from British India to the nation of Afghanistan. In India, manufacture of the pesh-kabz was centred in the northern city of Bhera, now part of Pakistan. During the First and Second Anglo-Afghan wars, the pesh-kabz was frequently the weapon of choice for finishing off wounded British and colonial troops, as the Afghan tribesmen did not take prisoners except for use as hostages. This is an attractive original example of the pesh-kabz / choora made in the Victorian era. It has an 8" single edged T section blade (12 ¾” overall). The blade with single edge narrows to a pin sharp point. The back of the blade has a small section of hand tooled decoration. The blade has staining consistent with age and a few small nibbles to the cutting edge consistent with use. It has the correct curved pronged pommel with small metal plate protrusion (most likely for cord attachment) and finger guard. The brass grip frame is decorated with crude hand tooled geometric and foliate designs with naïve red & orange enamel effect highlights. The scales are formed from sections of bone and polished horn. The knife is complete with its original wood lined, brass covered scabbard. The scabbard has ornate hand tooled foliate decoration. The throat has a copper plate insert. The scabbard has some minor dents consistent with age. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 17427:7
£225.00

Victorian Era North West Frontier Pesh-Kabz Choora / Khyber Afghan Armour Piercing Knife With Polished Bone / Antique Ivory Scales & Ornately Hand Tooled Brass Wrapped Wood Scabbard. Sn 17427:6 - 17427:6
The Pesh-Kabz or Choora is a type of Perso-Afghan knife designed to penetrate chain mail armour (see page 494 of Stone's book 'A Glossary Of Arms & Armour'). The knives were typically used as a thrusting weapon, however, the wide ‘T’ section blade also possesses considerable slicing performance, and as such may also be used effectively with slashing or cutting strokes. During the British Colonial rule in India, the British frequently referred to all Afghan blades of this pattern collectively as "Afghan knives" or "Khyber knives", after the Khyber Pass that marked the transition from British India to the nation of Afghanistan. In India, manufacture of the pesh-kabz was centred in the northern city of Bhera, now part of Pakistan. During the First and Second Anglo-Afghan wars, the pesh-kabz was frequently the weapon of choice for finishing off wounded British and colonial troops, as the Afghan tribesmen did not take prisoners except for use as hostages. This is a very good original example of the pesh-kabz / choora made in the Victorian era. It has an 8 ¼” single edged T section blade (13” overall). The blade with single edge and slight curve narrows to a pin sharp point. A small steel finger guard is riveted to the blade at the hilt and the spine of the blade at the hilt has a small section of scalloped decoration. The blade has just staining consistent with age. The knife has a small fixed metal bar protruding from the pommel grip frame most likely for cord attachment. The scales are polished bone or antique ivory secured to the tang by steel pins. The knife is complete with its original wood lined, brass wrapped scabbard. The scabbard has ornate hand tooled decoration. The tip of the scabbard is curved and has an ornate copper collar around the neck of the brass finial. The scabbard has some minor dents to be expected of a native weapon of its age. The throat of the scabbard has an integral small belt ring for lanyard. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 17427:6
£195.00

Late 1800's- Early 1900's, Arab Jambiya Knife With Ornate Hand Tooled White Metal Hilt Mounts Curved Double Edged Blade & Ornate Hand Tooled White Metal Covered Wood Scabbard With Hanging Rings & Cord. Sn 17427:5 - 17427:5
The Jambiya also known as the Arab knife is in some modification found in every country in which the Arabs have lived. The blade is always curved and double edged (see pages 310 to 314 of ‘A Glossary Of The Construction Decoration & Use Of Arms & Armour by Stone where many variants of Jambiya are described and illustrated). This is an excellent Jambiya most likely made in the late 1800's -Early 1900's. It has a typical 8 ¾” long double edged curved steel blade blade. The black stained wood handle has ornate hand tooled white metal hilt mounts with ball end pommel mount. The dagger measures 16 ½” overall and is complete with its original wood scabbard covered with white metal which is intricately hand tooled with decoration. The scabbard has a curved tip with white metal finial & 2 original white metal hanging rings fitted with later cord. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 17427:5
£325.00
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