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ARTILLERY Ammunition 37 mm +

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INERT DEACTIVATED. RARE. Unfired, German WW2, 1945 Dated 8.8 cm Flak 41, (88 x 855R) (APCBCHE/T) Armour Piercing Capped Ballistic Capped High Explosive/Trace Round (PzGr.39) Round. - O 1687
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a Rare unfired German WW2 1944 dated Flak 41, 8.8cm (88 x 855R) (APCBCHE/T) Armour Piercing Capped Ballistic Capped High Explosive/Trace (PzGr.39) round used in the Flak 41 88mm gun. The Flak 41 was a rare gun with approximately 500 guns being produced. The gun was a big improvement over the Flak 18 in terms of ceiling and armour penetration, but problems with ammunition extraction meant that only brass cartridge cases were later issued as standard. The gun had rear trunnions and so had a low silhouette for its size and capability and could be used it the anti-tank role effectively. The Flak 41 was issued with the standard 8.8cm Pzgr Patr 39/1 / Flak41 base fused projectile for the anti-tank use. The brass cartridge case is headstamped 8.8 Flak41 45 (1945 date) asb (Deutsche Waffen- u. Munitionsfabriken AG, Berlin- Borsigwalde) waa43. There is some minor cracking to the case mouth of the cartridge case which is not uncommon on this round. The round has an unfired Armour Piercing Capped Ballistic Capped High Explosive (APCBCHE/T) (PzGr.39) projectile. See page 172 Hogg, German Artillery of World War Two. No licence is required to possess this inert round in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. The price includes UK delivery. O 1687
1,200.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. WW1, German 21cm Mors (210x230R) Cartridge Case. - O 1669
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a WW1 German 21cm Mors (210x230R) brass cartridge case from the Krupp 21 cm which fired a 250 lb projectile up to a maximum range of 12,100 yards. The gun was used extensively during WW1 by the Germans and although the gun was designated as a mortor, it was a heavy howitzer which used a separate loading of the cartridge case and projectile. The guns were used extensively on both the western and eastern front lines and were very effective during opening of offensives. One of the cartridge cases are headatamped POLTE OCT 1917 (October 1917 date) MAGDEBURG and the other is headstamped Rh ME SEPT 1917 (September 1917 date) DUSSELDORF. The price is per cartridge case and includes UK delivery. No licence is required to possess this inert cartridge case in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. The price is per cartridge case and there are two cartridge cases available. O 1669
125.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. German, rare, 3.7cm Stielgranate 41 Hollow Charge, High Explosive Anti-Tank (HEAT) For German 3.7cm Pak 36 Anti-Tank Gun. - O 1665
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a rareGerman WW2 Stielgranate 41 hollow charged fin stabilised projectile for the Pak 36 anti-tank gun used by the German army from the start of WW2. It was soon discovered that the gun did not have the penetration power to defeat later tanks and to enhance its penetrating power a Hollow Charged High Explosive Anti-Tank (HEAT) projectile was developed that used a blank cartridge to launch it. The large projectile, 75cm in length was loaded at the muzzle and guided in the guns bore by a spigot attached to the fin assembly. Its penetrative power was great although a short range and low speed of the projectile limited its use. The projectile has an unfired AZ5075 alloy nose fuse, that was derived from the rifle grenade and is a direct action type armed by setback on firing. The fuse is stamped round its circumference eef (Heine u. Sohn, Voehrenbach) 42 (1942 date) 58 and waffenampt 54. The projectile has retains approximately much of its original green painted finish and is stamped round its circumference 95 Ge 9 42 (September 1942 date). The fin assembly retains approximately three quarters if its original green painted finish. A photograph shows a Pak36 with the projectile loaded, (See Hogg, German Artillery of WW2 pages 189 to 192). The price includes UK delivery and no licence is required to possess this inert round in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. O 1665
695.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. Dutch, Royal Netherlands Navy, 1926 Dated15cm (15 x 990R) Brass Naval Cartridge Case. - O 1663
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a very large Dutch 1926 Dated15cm (15 x 990R) naval brass separate loaded cartridge case. These 15cm/50, (5.9 inch) guns were fitted with horizontal sliding breech blocks were supplied by Bofors to the Royal Netherlands Navy in the 1920s and were fitted to the Java and Flores cruisers as well as the Johan Maurits van Nassau which was sunk on the 14th May 1940 by German aircraft in the Battle of the Afsluitdijk. This large brass cartridge case is headstamped PATRONFABRIK HEMBRUG 19 26 (1926 date stamped across the screw in primer) Om Mw . Hembrug is a state arsenal (Artillerie Inrichtingen) near Amsterdam and was opened in 1907 to produce ammunition, steel helmets, small arms as well as other equipment. The price for this rare large naval cartridge case includes UK delivery and no licence is required to possess this inert round in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. O 1663
750.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. Israeli Mint 60MM (60x410R) HVMS HE (High Explosive) Dummy Tank Round. - O 1659
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a near mint Israeli made 60mm (60x410R) HVMS HE (High Explosive) tank dummy round, developed by the Israelis in the early 1980s as an upgrade for the M-60 Sherman tank supplied to the Chilean government when they disposed of their old Sherman tanks. This modification included the replacement of the main gun with a 60 mm High-Velocity main gun and a new Detroit Diesel engine. This dummy round consists of a rimmed brass cartridge case which is headstamped M-052-60MM TZ 1/86 (January 1986 date) and two number 85s in a circle. The case is fitted with a screw in percussion brass primer and is stencilled in black round its circumference DUMMY AMM LOT IMI (Israeli Military Industries) 86-K-006. The steel projectile is fitted into the cartridge case with a single ring crimp and has a grooved copper driving band. The projectile retains all of its original light blue finish and is stencilled in white round its circumference 60G DUMMY M-55 a1 LOT IMI 86 K 006. The projectile is also stamped PH 1-86 60MM M52. The round is fitted with an alloy dummy nose fuse. No licence is required to possess this inert round in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display Price includes UK delivery. O 1659
395.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. Russian WW2 T34/85 Tank Unfired Three Quarter Sectioned 85mm Tank Gun (85x629R) HEAT/T (High Explosive Anti-Tank/Tracer) (Hollow Charge) (Fin Stabilised) Round. - O 1649
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a Russian T34/85 unfired Three Quarter Sectioned 85mm Tank Gun (85x629R) HEAT/T (High Explosive Anti-Tank/Tracer) (hollow charge) (Fin Stabilised) round for the T34/85 tank introduced in 1944. This gun was an improvement over the previous 76.2mm gun original fitted to the T34 tank and this gun was fitted from 1944 onwards. The projectile has a quarter section taken out of it to reveal the copper penetrating cone and the fold out stabilising fins. The projectile has a single iron band and retains most of its original grey paint with black stencilling. The projectile is stencilled in black A IX 1 BK2M . The driving band is stamped with an X . The quarter sectioned brass cartridge case is headstamped 26 over 55 30 6 over 8. The cartridge case is stencilled in back UBK 1M 85 D-44 85 SUiCZOLG 11/7 3/76 - 361 12/1 TR 3/76 -361 WTCh-10 4/76 -361 97 87 6 . The quarter sectioned steel primer is stamped KW-4 and 132 in an oval . All propellants and explosives have been replaced with inert substances. No licence is required to possess this inert round in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display Price includes UK delivery. O 1649
675.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. Russian T34/85 Tank WW2 1944 Dated Unfired 85mm Tank Gun (85x629R) APCR/T (Armour Piercing Composite Rigid/Trace) Round. - O 1648
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a Russian T34/85 unfired 85mm Tank Gun (85x629R) APCRT (Armour Piercing Composite Rigid/ Trace) round for the T34/85 tank introduced in 1944. This gun was an improvement over the previous 76.2mm gun original fitted to the T34 tank and this gun was fitted from 1944 onwards. The arrowhead projectile has two copper driving bands and is waisted in its middle. It has inside is a tungsten core for armour piercing. There is an alloy ballistic cap fitted at the top of the projectile. The projectile retains most of its original grey paint with a 10mm white band at the bottom of the ballistic cap . Above the white band is stencilled in black SZKOLNY . The top copper driving band is stamped SZKOLNY. The brass cartridge case is headstamped SZKOLNY 02 51r KO.. The cartridge case is stencilled in back UBR-367pk 85-39 85-d-44 58-SUiCZOLG 9/sw4/-361 18/tr/4/7-361 32-74-6 FD . The steel primer is stamped SK KW-4 31-53 27 in an oval No licence is required to possess this inert round in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display Price includes UK delivery. O 1648
595.00

DEACTIVATED INERT. Unfired Mint American 57mm T15 Recoilless Rifle (57x410R) High Explosive (HE) Round For The 57mm T15 Recoilless Rifle. - O 1644
DEACTIVATED INERT. This is a near mint unfired American 57mm (57x410R) T15 Recoilless Rifle High Explosive (HE) Round. this gun was developed from a captured German 10.5cm Leichgeschutz 40 recoilless gun that had a blow out breech plug and the Americans improved upon it by giving the bottleneck steel cartridge many holes in the sidewalls to release the propellant to the rear and also a pre engraved driving band to reduce thee initial pressure spike on firing. The gun was introduced in early 1945 and was fitted on a ground tripod. The gun was used to good effect mainly the pacific theatre where it gave the infantry a weapon that could fire both high explosive and smoke rounds. The gun proved very useful to the infantry in the battle of Okinawa and later on in the Korean War. This is near mint round for the 57mm T17 gun The brown lacquered steel cartridge case is headstamped 75MM-M31A1 SAP-1-2 1976. The base of the cartridge case is also stencilled in white AMM LOT SAP.1.8 SHELL M310A1 75MM RIFLE. The high explosive projectile retains most of its original green paint and is stencilled in yellow T 51 TNT SHELL M3094 ++. The projectile is also stamped over the pre engraved copper driving band LOT Y-E 1952 IP M309A1 XY-50 . The round is fitted with a brass and alloy point detonation nose fuse with a brass delay screw. The price includes UK delivery and no licence is required to possess this inert round in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. O 1644
495.00

INERT DEACTIVATED. British WW2, PIAT (Projector Infantry Anti-tank) HEAT (High Explosive Anti Tank) Round With Fuse. Sn - 19579
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a rare British WW2, PIAT (Projector Infantry Anti-tank) HEAT (High Explosive Anti Tank) round. The round is complete with its original nose fuse. The PIAT was designed in response to the British Army's need for a more effective hand-held infantry anti-tank weapon. It consisted of a steel tube, a trigger mechanism and firing spring, and was based on the spigot mortar system and instead of using a propellant to directly fire a round; the spring was cocked and tightened. When the trigger was pulled, it released the spring that pushed the spigot forward into the rear of the bomb. This detonated the cartridge in the base of the bomb, was then thrown forward off the spigot and if lucky re cocked the weapon for firing again. The PIAT possessed an effective range of approximately 100 yards. This system meant that the PIAT had several advantages, which included a lack of muzzle smoke to reveal the position of the user, the ability to fire it from inside buildings. The PIAT entered service in 1943, and was first used during the Allied invasion of Sicily that year; it remained in use with British and Commonwealth forces until the early 1950s. The PIAT replaced the .303 Boys anti-tank rifle which was adopted in 1937 and soon proved itself unable to defeating heavy armour. As well as being used in the anti-tank role, the PIAT was an effective way of opening doors on buildings at a safer distance and the resulting explosion was usually enough to subdue opposition in the building. This projectile retains some of its original green painted finish and is complete with its original alloy nose fuse and screw on fuse holder. The PIAT has its original hollow charge nose cone which is held on by a screw on pressed steel collar. The price for this round includes UK delivery and no licence is required to possess this inert round in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 19579
395.00

SOLD SOLD (LAY-AWAY 17/06) INERT DEACTIVATED. British WW2, PIAT (Projector Infantry Anti-tank) HEAT (High Explosive Anti Tank) Practice Round With Fuse, Fuse Holder And Firing Cartridge. Sn - 19578
INERT DEACTIVATED. This is a British WW2, PIAT (Projector Infantry Anti-tank) HEAT (High Explosive Anti Tank) Practice round. The round is complete with its original nose fuse and safety cap. The PIAT was designed in response to the British Army's need for a more effective hand-held infantry anti-tank weapon. It consisted of a steel tube, a trigger mechanism and firing spring, and was based on the spigot mortar system and instead of using a propellant to directly fire a round; the spring was cocked and tightened. When the trigger was pulled, it released the spring that pushed the spigot forward into the rear of the bomb. This detonated the cartridge in the base of the bomb, was then thrown forward off the spigot and if lucky re cocked the weapon for firing again. The PIAT possessed an effective range of approximately 100 yards. This system meant that the PIAT had several advantages, which included a lack of muzzle smoke to reveal the position of the user, the ability to fire it from inside buildings. The PIAT entered service in 1943, and was first used during the Allied invasion of Sicily that year; it remained in use with British and Commonwealth forces until the early 1950s. The PIAT replaced the .303 Boys anti-tank rifle which was adopted in 1937 and soon proved itself unable to defeating heavy armour. As well as being used in the anti-tank role, the PIAT was an effective way of opening doors on buildings at a safer distance and the resulting explosion was usually enough to subdue opposition in the building. This projectile retains some of its original black painted finish with a yellow bans round its circumference signifying a practice round. The correct nose fuse is held in by an extended pin which secures the bayonet fitting fuse protector. The body has a reinforced spigot without any cutaways allowing the PIAT to be reused several times. The body retains its original plaster weighted core. The price for this round includes UK delivery and no licence is required to possess this inert round in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 19578
0.00
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