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SOLD SOLD (19/03) Edwardian British Mameluke Pattern 1831 General Officer's Sword With Etched Blade, Antique Ivory Hilt & Scabbard. ED 2551 - ED 2551
The introduction of the 1831 pattern sword followed a vogue for mameluke style swords during the 1800’s. This pattern of sword is still worn today by British General Officers and Lord Lieutenants (see page 176 of World Swords by Withers and page 206 of Swords of the British Army by Robson). This is an original Edwardian British Mameluke Pattern 1831 General Officer's Sword. It has an etched blade and antique ivory scales. The sword has an undamaged 32” blade (37 ½” overall). The blade is fitted with original leather hilt washer. The blade has the ordnance acceptance proof roundel and star. There is no visible manufacturer’s name. The blade has decorative etched panels on both sides featuring foliate panels, crossed arms, Royal Cypher ‘ER VII’ (Edward VII Rex) & King’s Crown. The blade has staining consistent with age. The hilt has undamaged antique ivory scales and ornate gilded brass fittings including cross guard with ball finials, central wreathed crossed arms, pommel hole mounts and grooved decorated back strap. The sword has its original leather scabbard with brass mounts & 2 hanging rings. The scabbard has some service wear but no tears and all stitching is intact. The price includes UK delivery. (Ivory Content Comprises less Than 5% Volume & Weight). ED 2551
£0.00

Victorian, British Pattern 1827 Officer's Presentation Sword With Etched Blade ‘F.S.F.S From G. Cadets Of B. Co R.M.C.S Xmas 1869’ By C. Smith & Son London & Scabbard. ED 2552 - ED 2552
This is an original 1827 Pattern Sword & Scabbard. It has a has a 32 ½” blade (38 ½” overall) with partial fuller. The blade has staining consistent with age & etched on both sides with decorative foliate panels and banners. Both sides have 'Crown VR' Royal Cypher (Victoria Regina) and foliate panels. The ricasso has the ordnance acceptance star . The blade is also signed by the manufacturer C. Smith & Son 5 New Burlington St London’ & Royal Appointment. One side is inscribed with presentation detail ‘‘F.S.F.S From G. Cadets Of B. Co R.M.C.S Xmas 1869’. It has a voided full knuckle guard with the Rifle Brigade / Militia 'Queen’s Crown Above Slung Horn' badge. It has a curved stepped pommel with ball end, fish skin grip with wire binding in excellent condition. It is complete with steel scabbard with 2 hanging rings and large shoe. The scabbard has even patina consistent with age and service wear. The price for this sword worthy of further research regarding the presentation inscription includes UK delivery. ED 2552
£695.00

**WORLD’S SMALLEST* 1927-1935, German, Venus Waffenfabrik Tell II .177 Calibre Break Action Tin Plate Air Pistol. Sn 18085:24 - 18085:24
Venus Waffenfabrik of Mehlis Germany produced the Tell II Air pistol between 1927 & 1935. It is made of tin plate and measured 5 ½” overall length. It was advertised as 'The World's smallest spring piston Air Pistol' (see pages 157 & 158 of The Collectors Guide To Air Pistols by Hiller). Its unique concentric design made it the Father of several full size Air Pistols. Before cocking the pistol, a lever is swung out from the rear of the grip to afford mechanical advantage while cocking is performed. The Pistols were only made in No 1 Bore/ .177 calibre. This Tell II .177 Air pistol is in very good condition, fully functioning with original blue finish which is rubbed in areas consistent with age and use. Its original flat chequered wood grips are undamaged. The top of the compression cylinder is correctly stamped by the manufacturer 'D.R.G.M Tell II D.R.P' including the Venus Waffenfabrik factory combined 'V & W ' trade mark. The price for this air pistol which led the way for modern Air Pistols includes UK delivery. Sn 18085:24
£325.00

WW2 Imperial Japanese Army Nagoya Arsenal Arisaka 6.5mm Calibre Rifle With Imperial Chrysanthemum Insignia, Sling, Type 30 Kokura Arsenal Bayonet & Scabbard. Sn 17854 - 17854
The Arisaka Rifle was designed by Colonel Nariakira Arisaka 1852–1915. The Arisaka bolt-action rifle was used heavily everywhere the Imperial Japanese Army fought. This is an excellent Arisaka Bolt action Rifle. It has all original woodwork and metal work with original finish throughout. The wood has just bumps and bruises to be expected with age and service use. It has its original winged fore sight, flip up ladder rear sight, bayonet lug, sling swivels, cleaning rod and steel butt plate. The rifle is 50” overall length. At the end of WW2, one of the final standing orders of the Imperial Army was to file off the Emperor's family Chrysanthemum insignia, or 'Mon', from each of the rifles, thereby preventing the dishonour of surrendering the symbol. This rifle is one of the few to survive with the Chrysanthemum 'mon' insignia which is crisply stamped on the breech housing. The frame has the Nagoya arsenal mark and serial number ‘49031’ together with Japanese script inspection mark (all illustrated). Deactivated to UK/EU specification in 2018 the rifle cocks and dry fires. There is no visible external evidence of the deactivation process. The rifle has its original cleaning rod and its sling swivels are fitted with a brown leather sling. Included is an original Japanese Arisaka Bayonet 1897-1950 (Type 30) bayonet & scabbard (see page 203 of The Bayonet Book by Peter White). It has a hooked quillon and muzzle ring. The wood grips have the knocks bumps and bruises to be expected with age and service use. The blued 15 ¾” single edge blade with fullers is undamaged. The ricasso has crisp Kokura Arsenal mark. The metal scabbard has a ball tip and fixed belt bar. The price includes UK/EU deactivation certificate and UK delivery. Sn 17854
£1,200.00

DEACTIVATED INERT. Austro-Hungarian WW1 Heavy Schwere Zeitzunder Hand Grenade & Fuse Protector - 18210:19
DEACTIVATED INERT. This is a WW1 Austro-Hungarian Heavy Zeitzunder hand grenade and fuse protector. The body is cast out of cast iron and the spikes are not as pronounced as with other Austro-Hungarian hand grenades. This example is sometimes referred to a spily zietzunder and were probably made in Budapest. This example is complete with its original cast iron fuse holder which is a friction fit to the top of the grenade which held the friction fuse. The grenade complete with its original pressed steel fuse protector. The price for this hand grenade includes U.K. delivery. Sn. 18210:19
£275.00

DEACTIVATED INERT. WW1 Austro-Hungarian Type 1 Schwere Hand Grenade - 18210:20
DEACTIVATED INERT. This is a WW1 Austro-Hungarian Type 1 Schwere hand grenade made in WW1. This model of grenade is a late war version which is smaller than the previous Austro-Hungarian schwere hand grenades, has a smoother surface and resembles the British Mills hand grenade. The body is made of cast iron and the fuse holder screws into the top. The top of the grenade has a nipple which would have held the fuse. The price for this hand grenade includes U.K. delivery. Sn. 18210:20
£275.00

SOLD SOLD (17.03) DEACTIVATED INERT. Austro-Hungarian WW1 Medium Schwere Hand Grenade - 18210:21
DEACTIVATED INERT. This is a WW1 Austro-Hungarian Medium Schwere hand grenade made in WW1. This model of grenade is an improvement over the earlier primitive hand grenades. The grenade is smaller and more mills bomb shaped. The grenade is fitted with a sturdy screw off steel fuse protector to protect the pull cord on the fraction fuse. This grenade is complete with the fuse, Fuse body, friction igniter chord and the screw on protector cap. The fuse screws into the body with a left hand thread and the protective cap has a normal right hand thread so that the fuse cannot be unscrewed from grenade body when arming the grenade. The price for this hand grenade includes U.K. delivery. Sn. 18210:21
£0.00

DEACTIVATED INERT. Austro-Hungarian WW1 M15 Zeitundernandgranate Hand Grenade - 18210:22
DEACTIVATED INERT. This is an Austro-Hungarian M15 Zeitundernandgranate hand grenade made in WW1. This heavy grenade was capable of being launched by a rod from a rifle or hand thrown by hand using a bent steel rod throwing loop attached through a hole drilled diagonally through the top cap of the grenade. This is the throwing version of the hand grenade and is complete with its original throwing loop. The grenade would have originally been fitted with an inertia pull friction fuse at the bottom of the grenade that was unreliable due to it having very little protection from the elements. This grenade was later replaced by the M16 grenade with a smooth body, which was either a rifle or hand grenade. This later grenade was lighter and as a rifle grenade had more range. The price for this hand grenade includes U.K. delivery. Sn. 18210:22
£345.00

DEACTIVATED INERT. Austro-Hungarian WW1 Medium Schwere Hand Grenade - 18210:23
DEACTIVATED INERT. This is a WW1 Austro-Hungarian Medium Schwere hand grenade made in WW1. This model of grenade is an improvement over the earlier primitive hand grenades. The grenade is smaller and more mills bomb shaped. This grenade has a belt loop made of wire twisted to form a belt loop and then twisted round the segments to secure it. The top of the grenade has a pressed steel cap on the top to hold the fuse. The price for this hand grenade includes U.K. delivery. Sn. 18210:23
£275.00

SOLD 17/02 DEACTIVATED INERT. Rare Italian WWI Lenticolare M14 Discus Hand Grenade with Brass Fuze Holder. - 18210:24
SOLD 17/02 DEACTIVATED INERT. This is a rare Italian WWI Lenticolare M14 discus hand grenade and was one of the first hand grenades developed by the Italians in WW1. This grenade consists of two formed pressed bi convex steel discs held together with a rolled crimp. The top of the grenade has a brass fuse pocket inserted in the middle of it to hold a knurled brass fuse holder for the cord fuse that had to be lit before throwing the grenade. The bottom of this grenade has a raised nipple on it in the centre. This grenade is complete with its knurled cord fuse holder that screws into the top of the grenade. The price for this hand grenade includes U.K. delivery. Sn. 18210:24
£195.00

DEACTIVATED INERT. Rare Italian WWI Lenticolare M14 Discus Hand Grenade - 18210:25
DEACTIVATED INERT. This is a rare Italian WWI Lenticolare M14 discus hand grenade and was one of the first hand grenades developed by the Italians in WW1. This grenade consists of two formed pressed bi convex steel discs held together with a rolled crimp. The top of the grenade has a brass fuse pocket inserted in the middle of it to hold a knurled brass fuse holder for the cord fuse that had to be lit before throwing the grenade. The bottom of this grenade is rounded without a raised nipple on it in the centre. The price for this hand grenade includes U.K. delivery. Sn. 18210:25
£125.00

SOLD SOLD (18/03) Victorian British 16th The Queen's Lancers Officer’s Lance Cap / Chapka With Gilt Fittings, Silvered Queen’s Crown Plate, With Pre Boer War Battle Honours, Bullion Rosette, 3 Plumes & Original Image Of Officer Holding This Cap. - 18224
This is a scarce, original, Cavalry Officer’s Lance Cap of the 16th The Queen's Lancers recently found in a Lake District house. The cap was found together with an original sepia photograph of the Lancer’s Officer holding this cap & other items of his 16th Lancers equipment. The photograph accompanies the cap. The name of the Officer is unknown but the card that the image is mounted on has a period hand written signature which is indistinct and there is an impressed cartouche (illustrated in the images). In the image, the Officer is seen wearing his 1821 Pattern sword which was found at the same time as the cap and is available separately on this website stock number Sn 18225. Also found was the Officer’s Sabretache and Pair of Lances with pennants available separately on this website Sn 18227 & 18226. The 16th The Queen's Lancers was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army, first raised in 1759. It saw service for two centuries, before being amalgamated with the 5th Royal Irish Lancers to form the 16th/5th Lancers) in 1922. The Regiment was raised in 1759 by Colonel John Burgoyne as the 16th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, being the second of the new Regiments of Light Dragoons; it was also known as Burgoyne's Light Horse. The Regiment was closely involved, undertaking several cavalry charges, in the action leading up to the capture of the French Garrison of Belle Île in April 1761 during the Seven Years' War. It also made a major contribution to the British victories against the Spaniards at the Battle of Valencia de Alcántara in August 1762 and at the Battle of Vila Velha in October 1762 during the Anglo-Spanish War. In 1766 the Regiment was renamed after Queen Charlotte as the 2nd (or The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, the number being an attempt to create a new numbering system for the Light Dragoon Regiments. However, the old system was quickly re-established, with the Regiment returning as the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons in 1769. The Regiment arrived in New York in October 1776 for service in the American Revolutionary War. It was involved in fighting at the Battle of White Plains in October 1776, the Battle of Brandywine in September 1777 and the Battle of Germantown in October 1777 before seeing more action at the Battle of Crooked Billet in May 1778, the Battle of Barren Hill later that month and the Battle of Monmouth in June 1778. The Regiment returned to England in spring 1779. The Regiment next landed at Ostend in April 1793 for service in the Flanders Campaign and was present at the Siege of Valenciennes in June 1793, the Siege of Dunkirk in August 1793 and the Siege of Landrecies in April 1794. It also took part in the Battle of Beaumont in April 1794, the Battle of Willems in May 1794 and the Battle of Tournay in later that month before returning to England in February 1796. The Regiment was then based in Ireland between autumn 1802 and 1805. During the Napoleonic Wars the Regiment were ordered to support Sir Arthur Wellesley's Army on the Iberian Peninsula and landed at Lisbon in April 1809. The Regiment fought at the Second Battle of Porto in May 1809, the Battle of Talavera in July 1809 and the Siege of Ciudad Rodrigo in April 1810. The Regiment also saw action at the Battle of Bussaco in September 1810 the Battle of Sabugal in April 1811 and the Battle of Fuentes de Oñoro in May 1811. It next fought at the Battle of Salamanca in July 1812, the Siege of Burgos in September 1812 and the Battle of Vitoria in June 1813. It was next in action at the Siege of San Sebastián in August 1813 and having advanced into France, at the Battle of Nivelle in November 1813. The regiment took part in the Hundred Days landing at Ostend in May 1815. It charged with John Vandeleur's Cavalry Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815. After the battle, their commander, Lieutenant-colonel James Hay, lay so badly injured that he could not be moved from the field for eight days. The Regiment had been the sole British Cavalry Regiment to serve throughout the Peninsular War and at the Hundred Days. In the Victorian era, the Regiment was dispatched to Ireland in March 1816 where it was re-designated as a Lancer Regiment in September 1816, becoming the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons (Lancers). It returned from Ireland in June 1819 and was sent to India in 1822 where it saw action, using lances, against the Marathas at the Siege of Bharatpur in January 1826. It saw action again at the capture of Ghuznee in July 1839 during the First Anglo-Afghan War and at the Battle of Maharajpore in December 1843 during the Gwalior Campaign. It also took part in the Battle of Aliwal in January 1846, when the Regiment charged and dispersed a body of Sikhs ten times its size, and also fought at the Battle of Sobraon in February 1846 during the First Anglo-Sikh War. The Regiment’s title was simplified to the 16th (The Queen's) Lancers in 1861. It served in India between 1865 and 1876 and again between 1890 and 1899. Prior to the Boer Wars 1899-1902 the Regiment was awarded Battle Honours: Talavera, Fuentes d'Onor, Salamanca, Vittoria, Nive, Peninsula, Waterloo, Bhurtpore, Ghuznee 1839, Afghanistan 1839, Maharajpore, Aliwal, Sobraon. This 16th Lancer’s Lance Cap is all original and as found and un-messed with. It has the correct internal construction, skull and peak of black patent leather which has areas of service wear and waist of Gold lace. The rear has the correct gilt metal ring & hook with 4 leaf mount. The peak is adorned with gold purl. The cloth top and sides are covered in black cloth of the Regimental facing colour. Bullion cord extends across the top of the cap and down the 4 angles. The cap has stylised ‘VR’ Victoria Regina monogram rosette on a field of red and Lion’s head bosses. The cap is without its linked scales chain. It has a brass plume boss with post 1883 dramatic drooping black Swan’s feathers black horse hair plume (16th lancers plumes were White over Scarlet until were worn pre 1883, then Black. Included are 2 additional plumes found with the cap. One White Over Scarlet Swan’s Feathers, the other White over scarlet Horse Hair). The cap is fitted with the correct Victorian gilt rayed plate and silvered badge comprising the correct Victorian Crown Royal arms & correct pre Boer War Battle honours above banner ‘Sixteenth Lancers’. The cap has its original leather sweat band and part of its silk liner is present but partially detached. There are no visible manufacturer, size or date marks. The cap is approx UK size 6. The price for this impressive Lance Cap to a Prestigious Lancer’s Regiment worthy of further research and restoration includes UK delivery. Sn 18224
£0.00
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