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WWII Era Nazi German 8 Round Magazine with Correct Alloy Butt for the Luger P0 8 9mm Parabellum Semi Automatic Pistol & Luger Tool. 19966:31. - 19966:31
The Pistole Parabellum or Parabellum Pistole (Pistol Parabellum), commonly known as just Luger or Luger P08 is a toggle-locked recoil-operated semi-automatic pistol. The Luger was produced in several models and by several nations from 1898 to 1948. This is an original 8 Round Magazine for the Luger PO 8 9mm Parabellum Semi Automatic Pistols. The magazine has its original finish & has no dents. The magazine is correctly slotted for inspection and has a strong spring action. It loads as it should. It has the correct WW2 era alloy butt toggle stamped ‘e+Waffenamt 655’. *Magazine & Tool* The price includes UK delivery. 19966:31.
£250.00

*Large* Union Flag, Military Quality, New, Hand stitched panels, Size 6 Feet By 3 Feet With a Strong Heading and Toggled Top and a Bottom Cleats for Securing The Flag to the Pole Halyard. MISC 898. - MISC 898
The design of the Union Jack dates back to the Act of Union 1801 which united the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland (previously in personal union) to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. The flag consists of the red cross of Saint George (patron saint of England (which also represents Wales) edged in white, superimposed on the saltire of St Patrick (patron saint of Ireland), also edged in white, which are superimposed on the saltire of Saint Andrew (patron saint of Scotland). Wales is not represented in the Union Flag by Wales's patron saint, Saint David, because the flag was designed whilst Wales was part of the Kingdom of England. This is a brand new military quality Union flag, hand stitched panels, measuring 6 feet long by 3 feet tall. The flag is secured to a strong heading with a wooden toggled top cleat and a 28 inch bottom cleat for securing to the flag pole halyard. Price includes UK delivery. MISC 898.
£75.00

19th Century Imperial Russian Eugene Alexandrovich Lanceray Spelter Sculpture Of A Russian Soldier With A Rifle & Lance Behind His Fallen Horse After His Piece "Soldat au Combat, Derriere Son Cheval" On Solid Marble Base. Sn 18977 - 18977
Eugene Alexandrovich Lanceray was a famous Russian sculptor (1848-1886). He was famous for his equine & military studies. This is a spelter sculpture of an Imperial Russian soldier with a rifle and Lance behind his fallen horse after his piece listed in catalogues as being his "Soldat au Combat, Derriere son Cheval" (Combat Soldier Behind Fallen Horse). The hollow cast period reproduction of the original by Eugeny Lanceray is finely cast bronze on a heavy black marble base. The spelter is cast signed Lanceray. It is in excellent condition with original patina. The piece including base which has some small areas of wear measures 10”x6 ¾” x 1 ¼”. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 18977
£975.00

Cased, WWII 1939 British WD Officer's Pattern MK IX Military Marching Compass by J.M. Glauser. London & WW II era Brown Leather Case By J.L.F. & Co With Shoulder Strap. MISC 911 - MISC 911
Colonel William Willoughby Cole Verner patented several marching Compass designs. Whilst the basic prismatic compass design has its origins in Schmalcalder's patent of 1812 (Patent No 3545), Verner's Pattern is a significant development. Verner's Patents were all pocket compasses. Model numbers were issued to his compasses starting with a Verner's Pattern V with developments through to the VII, VIII and the IX of WW2. Verner's Pattern compasses are both incredibly popular with collectors as well being a compass that can still be practically and easily used today. The most common models are the Verner's Pattern VII and Verner's Pattern VIII which were mainly used during WW1. Their basic construction is a prismatic dry card compass with a both a momentary bearing lock and transit lock. This is an excellent original example of the MK IX. It is fully functioning. It has a brass case and is mounted with lanyard ring. The glass face and numbered brass outer ring are perfectly intact. The rear is stamped 'J.M. Glauser London – No B6130 MK IX 1939’. It is complete with brown leather case with hinged top and buckle fastener. The case is impressed ‘A – J.L.F. & Co’. The case has its original leather shoulder strap. All leather and stitching of the case are intact. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 911.
£275.00

1912-1959-WWI/II ‘Stars and Stripes’ American Flag. MISC 910. - MISC 910
The number of stars on the American flag first grew to 48 in 1912 with the addition of New Mexico and Arizona. President William Howard Taft issued an Executive Order that year that formalized the appearance of the flag for the first time. The Order indicated that the stars were to be arranged in six horizontal rows of eight each. This flag was official for 47 years. During this time, the United States emerged from the Great Depression and World War II as one of the leading nations of the world. Eight Presidents served under the 48-star flag; William H. Taft, Woodrow Wilson, Warren Harding, Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S Truman, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. This example measures 58” x 28” It has stitched edges, and a white hem on one side with brass ringed holes for pole mounting. The flag has some minor age related holes (see pictures). A great piece of history worthy of further investigation. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 910.
£175.00

*Large* Victorian Naval Bosuns Cosh/Persuader. MISC 908. - MISC 908
This is a Bosuns’ starter, or cosh, and was used by ships’ Bosuns to hit (or start) slow or lazy sailors, making them work faster. These instruments are also sometimes ironically called ‘persuaders’. Ships’ Bosuns supervised the crew in sailing the vessel and maintaining the ropes, rigging, boats, anchors and stores on board. Clearly this was a role that required very strict discipline, hence this type of instrument commonly used to keep the crew on their toes. Later in the19th century, brutal punishments on board Royal Navy ships began to be frowned upon by society and these types of cruel instruments, along with the notorious punishment of flogging, became less common. Many Bosuns’ starters seem to have been made with great care and skill. Some are designed with a handle and rope with a weighted end, whilst others, like this one, are more rod-like. It consists of a wooden bound (likely Malacca wood) core with a weighted end made of lead and bound in twine knot work. The handle end is bound in tan leather held with brass coloured pins *one appears to be missing*. Measuring 47 cm in length and weighing 0.434g, this unusually large cosh/pacifier/starter is in very good condition for its age (see pictures) . A collectors piece which would warrant some interesting extra investigation. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 908. (Truncheons)
£275.00

Victorian Naval Bosuns Cosh/Persuader. MISC 907. - MISC 907
This is a Bosuns’ starter, or cosh, and was used by ships’ Bosuns to hit (or start) slow or lazy sailors, making them work faster. These instruments are also sometimes ironically called ‘persuaders’. Ships’ Bosuns supervised the crew in sailing the vessel and maintaining the ropes, rigging, boats, anchors and stores on board. Clearly this was a role that required very strict discipline, hence this type of instrument commonly used to keep the crew on their toes. Later in the19th century, brutal punishments on board Royal Navy ships began to be frowned upon by society and these types of cruel instruments, along with the notorious punishment of flogging, became less common. Many Bosuns’ starters seem to have been made with great care and skill. Some are designed with a handle and rope with a weighted end, whilst others, like this one, are more rod-like. It consists of a wooden bound (likely Malacca wood) core with weighted ends made of lead and bound in twine knot work *one end missing some twine* The two ends have brass coloured caps with a floral engraving. Measuring 30 cm in length and weighing 0.198g, this cosh/pacifier/starter is in good condition for its age (see pictures) . A collectors piece which would warrant some interesting extra investigation. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 907. (Truncheons)
£195.00

WW1 campaign medals ‘Trio’ and ‘Death Plaque’ to ‘A.G.C. Mousley R.F.A. with ‘Commonwealth War Graves’ printout. MISC 905 - MISC 905
The 1914 Star or 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal respectively. These medals were primarily awarded to the Old Contemptible (B.E.F.). and by convention all three medals are worn together and in the same order from left to right when viewed from the front. The WWI Memorial Plaque was made from Bronze and hence it was popularly known as the “Dead Man’s Penny” among front-line troops, also becoming widely known as, the “Death Penny”, “Death Plaque” or “Widow's Penny”. It was in October 1916 that the British Government setup a committee for the idea of a commemorative plaque that could be given to the next of kin for those men and women whose deaths were due to the First World War of 1914-18. This ensemble is set onto and fixed to a piece of velvet covered hardboard, with the 1914 Star being engraved with ‘HMBR A.G.C Mousley A.F.A.’ The ‘Commonwealth War Graves’ printout gives personal and military details of ‘Arthur George Culver Mousley’. A great piece of history, worthy of further investigation. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 905. (Top of Drawers)
£325.00

1910 H.M.S. London ‘Sweetheart Brooch/Medallion’ Birmingham Silver Hallmark, in Fitted Case and Postcards. MISC 904. - MISC 904
A H.M.S. London ‘Sweetheart Brooch/Medallion’ with a Birmingham Silver Hallmark, in a fitted case and three postcards of H.M.S. London. During the course of the war, servicemen leaving home for the front line had to say goodbye to those they loved, and often left gifts and keepsakes for those they’d be missing. One popular gift was a small brooch depicting the service crest or regimental badge of the soldier in question. This gift was intended for soldiers to show that their home and their families would be in their hearts during their absence. The name ‘sweetheart’ can be misleading here, as it suggests that the item was only given to those in intimate relationships, but this isn’t the case. The sweetheart brooch was given to anyone the soldier would be leaving behind; therefore this could be their wife, parents, and even children. If it was given to a wife or a girlfriend, it was worn by that woman as a symbol of their pride and regard for their soldier. The ‘swivelling’ brooch is 4 ½ cm x 3 ¼ cm in silver with H.M.S. London to one side with a crest between two Dragons and the other is H.M.S. London with hallmarks *pin missing* the Birmingham hallmark dating it to 1910. It is encased in a fitted screw top case *1 ½ cm damage, see pictures* with a magnified window and a manufacturers sticker inside ‘The Welham Mfg Co. Medallists 6 & 8 Gt Chapel St London’. One postcard is 21 ½ cm x 16 ½ cm and is a black and white photograph of H.M.S. London with what appear to be New Year wishes to the front. The second is 14 cm x 8 ½ cm and a copy of an oil painting of H.M.S. London printed by ‘Raphael Tuck & Sons’ Art publishers to the King & Queen. The third is a B&W photograph of H.M.S. London, dated 30.12.1910 and is a New Year message to a sweetheart. A lovely bundle of memorabilia for the collector. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 904. (Medals)
£195.00

Commemorative Desk Model Sea Mine to Commodore C J Clarke, Commodore Minor War Vessels and Minewarfare, 16 Dec 1986 – 11 Oct 1988. - MISC 903
This is a commemorative desk top model of a sea mine presented to Commodore C J Clarke, Commodore Minor War Vessels and Minewarfare, 16 Dec 1986 – 11 Oct 1988 upon him leaving posting on the 11 Oct 1988. The Commodore of Minor War Vessels and Minewarfare is the navy’s responsibility for mines warfare by ship or divers and often involves disposing of old ordnance. Commodore C J Clarke was responsible whilst in his post for unveiling the memorial to the Men of the Royal And Allied Navies Minesweeping Service (HMS Lochinvar), Port Edgar which is at the Port Edgar Marina at South Queensferry in Edinburgh. The memorial was unveiled by Commodore C J Clarke on the 14th April 1988 to remember the men of the Royal Navy and Allies minesweeping and fisheries protection vessels since 1939. The mine is made out of solid brass with brass mine horns on it and is attached to a wooden plinth measuring 7” by 5”. The plaque is engraved ‘Commodore C J Clarke, Commodore Minor War Vessels and Minewarfare, 16 Dec 1986 – 11 Oct 1988’. The price for this attractive piece of memorabilia includes U.K. delivery. MISC 903
£375.00
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