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Military Headgear - Helmets

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Post 1902 British 16th The Queen's Lancers Trooper’s Lance Cap / Chapka With King’s Crown Plate & Pre WW1 Battle Honours, Rosette,Black Horse Hair Plume & Lines. Sn 14666:8. - Sn 14666:8
The 16th The Queen's Lancers was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army, first raised in 1759. It saw service for two centuries, before being amalgamated with the 5th Royal Irish Lancers to form the 16th/5th Lancers) in 1922. The Regiment was raised in 1759 by Colonel John Burgoyne as the 16th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, being the second of the new Regiments of Light Dragoons; it was also known as Burgoyne's Light Horse. The Regiment was closely involved, undertaking several cavalry charges, in the action leading up to the capture of the French Garrison of Belle Île in April 1761 during the Seven Years' War. It also made a major contribution to the British victories against the Spaniards at the Battle of Valencia de Alcántara in August 1762 and at the Battle of Vila Velha in October 1762 during the Anglo-Spanish War. In 1766 the Regiment was renamed after Queen Charlotte as the 2nd (or The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, the number being an attempt to create a new numbering system for the Light Dragoon Regiments. However, the old system was quickly re-established, with the Regiment returning as the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons in 1769. The Regiment arrived in New York in October 1776 for service in the American Revolutionary War. It was involved in fighting at the Battle of White Plains in October 1776, the Battle of Brandywine in September 1777 and the Battle of Germantown in October 1777 before seeing more action at the Battle of Crooked Billet in May 1778, the Battle of Barren Hill later that month and the Battle of Monmouth in June 1778. The Regiment returned to England in spring 1779. The Regiment next landed at Ostend in April 1793 for service in the Flanders Campaign and was present at the Siege of Valenciennes in June 1793, the Siege of Dunkirk in August 1793 and the Siege of Landrecies in April 1794. It also took part in the Battle of Beaumont in April 1794, the Battle of Willems in May 1794 and the Battle of Tournay in later that month before returning to England in February 1796. The Regiment was then based in Ireland between autumn 1802 and 1805. During the Napoleonic Wars the Regiment were ordered to support Sir Arthur Wellesley's Army on the Iberian Peninsula and landed at Lisbon in April 1809. The Regiment fought at the Second Battle of Porto in May 1809, the Battle of Talavera in July 1809 and the Siege of Ciudad Rodrigo in April 1810. The Regiment also saw action at the Battle of Bussaco in September 1810 the Battle of Sabugal in April 1811 and the Battle of Fuentes de Oñoro in May 1811. It next fought at the Battle of Salamanca in July 1812, the Siege of Burgos in September 1812 and the Battle of Vitoria in June 1813. It was next in action at the Siege of San Sebastián in August 1813 and having advanced into France, at the Battle of Nivelle in November 1813. The regiment took part in the Hundred Days landing at Ostend in May 1815. It charged with John Vandeleur's Cavalry Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815. After the battle, their commander, Lieutenant-colonel James Hay, lay so badly injured that he could not be moved from the field for eight days. The Regiment had been the sole British Cavalry Regiment to serve throughout the Peninsular War and at the Hundred Days. In the Victorian era, the Regiment was dispatched to Ireland in March 1816 where it was re-designated as a Lancer Regiment in September 1816, becoming the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons (Lancers). It returned from Ireland in June 1819 and was sent to India in 1822 where it saw action, using lances, against the Marathas at the Siege of Bharatpur in January 1826. It saw action again at the capture of Ghuznee in July 1839 during the First Anglo-Afghan War and at the Battle of Maharajpore in December 1843 during the Gwalior Campaign. It also took part in the Battle of Aliwal in January 1846, when the Regiment charged and dispersed a body of Sikhs ten times its size, and also fought at the Battle of Sobraon in February 1846 during the First Anglo-Sikh War. The Regiment’s title was simplified to the 16th (The Queen's) Lancers in 1861. It served in India between 1865 and 1876 and again between 1890 and 1899. Prior to the Boer Wars 1899-1902 the Regiment was awarded Battle Honours: Talavera, Fuentes d'Onor, Salamanca, Vittoria, Nive, Peninsula, Waterloo, Bhurtpore, Ghuznee 1839, Afghanistan 1839, Maharajpore, Aliwal, Sobraon. During the Boer wars 1899-1902 the Regiment landed at Cape Colony in January 1900 for service in the Second Boer War and took part in the relief of Kimberley in February 1900. This is a scarce, original, Cavalry Trooper’s Lance Cap of the 16th The Queen's Lancers (see multiple entries in the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman which illustrates & describes, in detail, the components & construction of Lance caps & page 96 which illustrates a 16th Lancers KC plate, the same as ours). The Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, skull and peak of black patent leather with waist of yellow cloth and red band. The rear has the correct brass metal ring & hook with 4 leaf mount. The cloth sides are covered in black cloth of the Regimental facing colour. Yellow cord with brass finials extends down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct green and yellow wool ball rosette with Kings Crown ‘QL XVI’ (Queens 16th Lancers) button and Lion’s head bosses with leather backed link chain. It has a brass plume boss with black horse hair plume. The cap is fitted with the correct King’s Crown metal rayed plate and badge comprising the correct Royal arms & pre WW1 battle Honours above banner ‘Sixteenth Lancers’. The Lance Cap is complete with original leather sweat band liner. The crown of the cap has a size label 6 5/8. The size is repeated in contemporary white paint on the liner. The cap has its original Lines. The price for this impressive Lance Cap to a Prestigious Lancer’s Regiment includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:8.
£1,575.00

Victorian British 16th The Queen's Lancers Officer’s Lance Cap / Chapka With Gilt Fittings, Silvered Queen’s Crown Plate, With Pre Boer War Battle Honours, Bullion Rosette & Black Horse Hair Plume. Sn 17600. - SN 17600
The 16th The Queen's Lancers was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army, first raised in 1759. It saw service for two centuries, before being amalgamated with the 5th Royal Irish Lancers to form the 16th/5th Lancers) in 1922. The Regiment was raised in 1759 by Colonel John Burgoyne as the 16th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, being the second of the new Regiments of Light Dragoons; it was also known as Burgoyne's Light Horse. The Regiment was closely involved, undertaking several cavalry charges, in the action leading up to the capture of the French Garrison of Belle Île in April 1761 during the Seven Years' War. It also made a major contribution to the British victories against the Spaniards at the Battle of Valencia de Alcántara in August 1762 and at the Battle of Vila Velha in October 1762 during the Anglo-Spanish War. In 1766 the Regiment was renamed after Queen Charlotte as the 2nd (or The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, the number being an attempt to create a new numbering system for the Light Dragoon Regiments. However, the old system was quickly re-established, with the Regiment returning as the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons in 1769. The Regiment arrived in New York in October 1776 for service in the American Revolutionary War. It was involved in fighting at the Battle of White Plains in October 1776, the Battle of Brandywine in September 1777 and the Battle of Germantown in October 1777 before seeing more action at the Battle of Crooked Billet in May 1778, the Battle of Barren Hill later that month and the Battle of Monmouth in June 1778. The Regiment returned to England in spring 1779. The Regiment next landed at Ostend in April 1793 for service in the Flanders Campaign and was present at the Siege of Valenciennes in June 1793, the Siege of Dunkirk in August 1793 and the Siege of Landrecies in April 1794. It also took part in the Battle of Beaumont in April 1794, the Battle of Willems in May 1794 and the Battle of Tournay in later that month before returning to England in February 1796. The Regiment was then based in Ireland between autumn 1802 and 1805. During the Napoleonic Wars the Regiment were ordered to support Sir Arthur Wellesley's Army on the Iberian Peninsula and landed at Lisbon in April 1809. The Regiment fought at the Second Battle of Porto in May 1809, the Battle of Talavera in July 1809 and the Siege of Ciudad Rodrigo in April 1810. The Regiment also saw action at the Battle of Bussaco in September 1810 the Battle of Sabugal in April 1811 and the Battle of Fuentes de Oñoro in May 1811. It next fought at the Battle of Salamanca in July 1812, the Siege of Burgos in September 1812 and the Battle of Vitoria in June 1813. It was next in action at the Siege of San Sebastián in August 1813 and having advanced into France, at the Battle of Nivelle in November 1813. The regiment took part in the Hundred Days landing at Ostend in May 1815. It charged with John Vandeleur's Cavalry Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815. After the battle, their commander, Lieutenant-colonel James Hay, lay so badly injured that he could not be moved from the field for eight days. The Regiment had been the sole British Cavalry Regiment to serve throughout the Peninsular War and at the Hundred Days. In the Victorian era, the Regiment was dispatched to Ireland in March 1816 where it was re-designated as a Lancer Regiment in September 1816, becoming the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons (Lancers). It returned from Ireland in June 1819 and was sent to India in 1822 where it saw action, using lances, against the Marathas at the Siege of Bharatpur in January 1826. It saw action again at the capture of Ghuznee in July 1839 during the First Anglo-Afghan War and at the Battle of Maharajpore in December 1843 during the Gwalior Campaign. It also took part in the Battle of Aliwal in January 1846, when the Regiment charged and dispersed a body of Sikhs ten times its size, and also fought at the Battle of Sobraon in February 1846 during the First Anglo-Sikh War. The Regiment’s title was simplified to the 16th (The Queen's) Lancers in 1861. It served in India between 1865 and 1876 and again between 1890 and 1899. Prior to the Boer Wars 1899-1902 the Regiment was awarded Battle Honours: Talavera, Fuentes d'Onor, Salamanca, Vittoria, Nive, Peninsula, Waterloo, Bhurtpore, Ghuznee 1839, Afghanistan 1839, Maharajpore, Aliwal, Sobraon. This is a scarce, original, Cavalry Officer’s Lance Cap of the 16th The Queen's Lancers. The Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, skull and peak of black patent leather with waist of Gold lace and red band. The rear has the correct gilt metal ring & hook with 4 leaf mount. The peak is adorned with gold purl. The cloth top and sides are covered in black cloth of the Regimental facing colour. Bullion cord extends across the top of the cap and down the 4 angles. The cap has stylised monogram rosette on a field of red and Lion’s head bosses with velvet backed link chain. It has a brass plume boss with dramatic black horse hair plume. The cap is fitted with the correct Victorian gilt rayed plate and silvered badge comprising the correct Victorian Crown Royal arms & correct pre Boer War Battle honours above banner ‘Sixteenth Lancers’. The Lance Cap is complete with original leather sweat band and silk liner which are clean but have service wear to be expected. There are no visible manufacturer, size or date marks. The cap is approx UK size 7 ½. The price for this impressive Lance Cap to a Prestigious Lancer’s Regiment includes UK delivery. Sn 17600.
£2,850.00

1974-Northern Ireland Fire Authority Assistant Divisional Officers Fire Helmet. Sn: 1783. - Sn:1783
A very nice Assistant Divisional Officers white Fire Helmet in padded and covered plastic *loose to the rear* to the Northern Ireland Fire Authority with a front transfer badge worn from 1950-75. It has a broad black & a narrow black rank stripe *see pictures* and inside has its original removable leather liner and chinstrap. Manufacturers stamp in the helmet (Helmets Ltd County Style – Made in England’, "Small, up to 6 7/8". 1974"". Superb condition. Sn: 1783.
£175.00

WWII British Army ‘Tommy Helmet’ with Original Liner & Finish. 19966:17. - 19966:17
This is an excellent, original, WW2 era steel 'Tommy' Combat helmet. This helmet has all of its original smooth finish & has no dents. The helmet is marked ‘F&L’ (Fisher & Ludlow, manufacturers of Birmingham) and 1/1940 (January 1940) it has been faintly inscribed with what looks like the soldiers name ‘L.Worth’on the inside of the rim. It has its original oil cloth sweat band liner & webbing chinstrap all of which are intact. The helmet is approx. UK size 7. The price includes UK delivery. 19966:17.
£195.00

RESERVED RESERVED American Vietnam War Period M1 Combat Helmet, Liner, & Camouflage Cover. HE 842. - HE 842
This is an original American Vietnam War period M1 combat helmet complete with its original liner, *missing sweatband* and camouflage cover. The outer helmet has its original sand texture green finish on it. The (large size) helmet has its original cloth camouflage cover the camouflage cover has buttonholes sewn into it to hold foliage and appears to have seen service. The inner helmet retains most of its original green finish. The helmet and all of its accessories show signs of use and service wear. The price for this helmet includes U.K. delivery. HE 842.
£275.00

WWI French Artillery ‘Adrian’ Steel Helmet with WWI Dated Brass Peak Cover. HE 841. - HE 841
An original condition WWI French Artillery Adrian steel helmet (The Adrian helmet (French: Casque Adrian) was an influential design of combat helmet originally produced for the French Army during World War I. Its original version, the M15, was the first standard helmet of the French Army and was designed when millions of French troops were engaged in trench warfare, and head wounds from the falling shrapnel generated by indirect fire became a frequent cause of battlefield casualties. Introduced in 1915, it was the first modern steel helmet and it served as the basic helmet of many armies well into the 1930s. Initially issued to infantry soldiers, in modified form they were also issued to cavalry and tank crews. This example with black paint, RF Grenade and crossed cannons badge to the front *slight play*. It is missing its brown leather chinstrap but has its original 6 tongue oilcloth liner. This helmet has a brass peak cover with intricate laurel leaves and ‘Colomead Lieutenant Colonel Soldat de la Grande Guerre 1914-1918 imprinted. Price includes UK delivery. HE 841.
£375.00

British WW2, 1940 Dated Tommy Helmet By Fisher & Ludlow Limited. - HE 838
This is an original British 1940 dated tommy helmet. The helmet retains much of its original worn green painted finish and has the steel safety ring attached to the rim of the helmet. The helmet is stamped to the rear inside rim F&L (Fisher and Ludlow Ltd of Birmingham).1940 (1940 date) MS . The helmet retains its black rubberised sweatband attached to the crossed steel adapter which is held by a single screw to the inside of the helmet. The webbing chin strap has a steel buckle and expanding webbing covered tensioning spring attaching it to the helmet. The price of this helmet includes U.K. delivery. HE 838
£195.00

**MINT**UNISSUED**Indochina War Era French 1951 Dated Casque Model 50 / Type 202 Paratrooper’s Training Helmet By Gueneau & Cie Paris. HE 835 - HE 835
The First Indochina War (generally known as the Indochina War in France, and as the Anti-French Resistance War in Vietnam) began in French Indochina on December 19, 1946, and lasted until July 20, 1954. This is a near mint unissued condition Casque (helmet) model 50 (1950) / Type 202 French military paratrooper’s training helmet dated 1951 (a copy of a contemporary image of French paratroopers wearing these helmets is illustrated in image 1). Made of a light padded shell with khaki cloth covering, side and neck skirt and cloth chin cup. The helmet is in excellent order, near mint and un-issued. The inside has its original liner and clean manufacturer label ‘E. Gueneau & Cie 6 Fauberg Saint Honore Paris 8e number 253/c, date of manufacture in French Juillet 51 (July 1951) size 56 Type Para (UK 6 7/8). The price includes UK delivery. HE 835
£275.00

**RARE**Imperial Prussian Guard’s M1871 Spike Top Pickelhaube General Rank Officer’s Helmet With Horse Hair Plume State & National Cockades. Sn 19132 - 19132
This is a rare to find original Imperial Prussian Guards Model 1871 Pickelhaube for Officer’s of General rank. A similar M1897 Imperial Prussian General’s helmet attributed to Kaiser Wilhelm is illustrated on page 267 of the Pickelhaube by Bowman.The hard boiled leather body is excellent. It has the guard eagle and enamelled guard star adorns the centre of the eagle and displays a fantastic combination of multicolored enamel with the black and gold eagle of the House of Hohenzollern's nobility. It also has the motto 'Suum Cuique' (may all get their due / to each their own). All brass fittings are present and undamaged including the leather backed linked chain. The fluted, silvered spike is mounted with original white horse hair plume. The leather sweatband is clean and undamaged. The silk liner is present but worn with age and service wear. There are no maker, date or Regiment marks visible on the helmet. The price for this rare, Imperial Prussian high ranking Officer’s pickelhaube includes UK delivery. Sn 19132
£2,850.00

UNAVAILABLE UNAVAILABLE..1974 Dated Israel Defence Forces (IDF) Paratrooper’s 2 Part Jump Helmet With Correct Liner & Desert Sand Colour Camouflage Net Cover With Label All With IDF Stylised ‘Z’ Zahal Marks. HE 834 - HE 834
This is an authentic IDF 2 part helmet used by Israeli Paratroopers in the 1970’s. The helmet comes with its original vintage worn desert sand colour camo net and elastic attaching band. Both parts of this helmet have the official stylised "Z" IDF/Zahal marks. The fibre lining has indistinct marks. The shell manganese shell has ink shell size ‘56’. The camo net has a nice original 1974 dated label with IDF Zahal marks and Hebrew script . Also has its original webbing para chin strap with leather chin pad. The helmet and liner have no dents and original colour. It is approx. UK size 7. The price includes UK delivery. HE 834
£0.00
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