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Antique Guns and Equipment

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British, Yeomanry, Paget Flintlock .66” Calibre Carbine with 21 “ Barrel. Sn - 12851:10
The Paget flintlock carbine was adopted in 1808 to replace the existing Elliot and 1796 carbines which featured a captive ramrod and a shortened barrel. The carbine had a long life and ended its service in Yeomanry divisions. Paget carbines were made with a barrel length of 16 inches and were generally regarded as being ineffective due to their short range. This is a flintlock Paget carbine with a 21 barrel and a 37 inch stock. The carbine is fitted with the 5 ½ inch India Pattern pistol lock and the barrel has Birmingham proof marks with the makers stamp S&S between them. The captive steel ramrod is attached with a swivel bridal and has a large round head at the top. The carbine is fitted with one brass flared ramrod tube. The gun has its original walnut stock which has minor knocks, bumps and bruises to be expected with age and service use. The gun has brass furniture including butt plate, trigger guard, fore end and ram rod mounts. The round steel ramrod has a round rammer head. The metal work has even patina throughout and the barrel has staining and residue consistent with age and use. The price includes UK delivery. As an antique musket no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 21851:10
£1,295.00

East India Company Type B .75” Musket Bore Percussion Musket. Sn - 21851:9
This is an East India Company type B percussion musket. This musket was an early percussion conversion of the EIC flintlock gun by fitting a new breech plug with an integral nipple that replaced the earlier breech plug. The musket retained the original profile lock of the flintlock which was changed on the model C. The gun measures 54 inches in length. The 39 inch round steel barrel has a block foresight and a V back sight. The original percussion lock plate is held in by three side pins with a flat brass sideplate. The lockplate is stamped with the EIC rampant lion and cocks correctly. The gun has its original walnut stock which has the knocks, bumps and bruises to be expected with age and service use. The gun has brass furniture including butt plate, trigger guard, fore end and ram rod mounts. The round steel ramrod has a round rammer head. The metal work has even patina throughout and the barrel has staining and residue consistent with age and use. The price includes UK delivery. As an antique musket no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 21851:9
£895.00

Scarce, Dublin, Preventative Water Guard, PWG, (Pre 1822 Coastguard), Quality, Rigby of Dublin .650” bore Flintlock Carbine. Sn - 21851:8
John Rigby is a famous gunmaker of quality guns founded in Dublin in 1775. During the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815), smugglers were extremely active in the waters around the southern and eastern coasts of Ireland. In an effort to deal with this problem, the British Government established the P.W.G. (Preventative Water Guard) in 1809. The Guard operated small boats along the shore to intercept smugglers who had escaped the larger Revenue cutters out at sea. Despite also having Customs Officers on land, this response proved to be inadequate and smuggling continued to thrive. By 1819 the Commissioners of Customs in Dublin were forced to look for help from the Controller General of the Water Guards deputy, General James Dombrain who went to south-west Cork where he set about re-organising the Water Guard. In 1822, the Preventative Water Guard, Revenue cutters and Customs Officers were all amalgamated into the Coast Guard under the Board of Customs who set about building a line of stations around the coast of Ireland. This is a flintlock carbine with a captive ramrod made Rigby of Dublin. The carbine has a 21 ½ inch damascus barrel an overall length of 37 inches. The top of the damascus .650 “ bore barrel is stamped DUBLIN P.W.G (Port Water Guard) and has a rearsight forged into the top of the tang. The lockplate is stamped RIGBY and has a chamfered border. The lockplate is held on by 2 sidenails that are screwed through 2 recessed brass ferules. The barrel has a captive ramrod on a recessed mount which is stamped with the number 1765 on the left hand side where a bayonet could be carried and fixed to the bayonet stud that also acts a fore sight. The carbine has a fine walnut stock which has minor knocks and bumps with use. The damascus barrel is smooth with a nice patina and the bore has staining and residue with use. The lock has a strong and crisp action. The walnut stock is in a nice condition with no cracks with only minor knocks and bumps with age. NB As an antique carbine no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. The price includes U.K. delivery. Sn 21851:8
£1,495.00

**Napoleonic War Period**. Scarce, British Officers .75” Bore, 28 inch Barrel, Pattern 1796 Harcotts Heavy Dragoon Flintlock Carbine by P.Bond of London. Sn - 21851:7
In addition to various types of swords the cavalry was armed with pistols and carbines. As with swords, 1796 saw the introduction of several new standard firearms. This carbine of 0.76 inch calibre was shorter than the infantry musket, which made it easier to use when mounted. The carbine could be fitted with a bayonet. The barrel is nearly full stocked, ½ inches from the muzzle and has a brass nose cap and two brass ramrod pipes that retain a steel ramrod. The pattern 1796 heavy dragoon carbine had the same calibre as the infantry musket making ammunition supply easier. This is a Napoleonic War period British officers .75” bore Pattern 1796 Heavy Cavalry Carbine made by P. Bond of London. Edward Bond had a gunsmiths shop at 59 Lombard Street, from 1774 to 1794. He became master of the gun-makers company in 1780 and died in 1790. His son Phillip Bond took over his company until 1810. Philip Bond also had a workshop at 45 Cornhill London between 1800-1816 when he died in 1816. The carbine has a 28 inch barrel which is the barrel length of the Harcourt Carbine of 1793 with an overall length of 44 inches. The Harcourt carbine was made in a limited production by Henry Nock called the pattern 1796 Harcourt carbine and was replaced in 1798 by the heavy Dragoon Carbine Pattern 1796. This would date the weapon to pre 1798. The lockplate is engraved P BOND and has a bevelled edge and is retained by 3 sidenails from the flat brass side plate. The barrel is London proofed and carries the makers mark star over PB (Philip Bond) between the proof marks which was Philip Bonds mark. The barrel is retained at the breach by a screw at the tang and 3 flat barrel wedges. The musket has a simple small rectangular block foresight that also serves as a bayonet lug. The carbine has a tapered button heads steel ramrod which fits nicely in the pipes. There is a blank oval brass escutcheon fitted to the top of the wrist. The barrel is smooth with a nice patina and the bore has staining and residue with use. The lock has a strong and crisp action. The walnut stock is in a nice condition with no cracks with only minor knocks and bumps with age. See pages 58 & 59 British Military Longarms 1715-1815 by D.W. Bailey, British Military Firearms 1650-1850 by Howard l. Blackmore, Chapter 5 in British Cavalry Carbines & Pistols of the Napoleonic Era by Barry Chisnall and Geoffrey Davies & British Gunsmiths by Nigel Brown, Page 143. NB As an antique musket no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. The price includes U.K. delivery. Sn 21851:7
£2,750.00

**Napoleonic War Period**. Scarce, British Officers .65” Calibre, Model 1773 Eliott Service Flintlock Carbine by Mather of Newcastle. Sn - 21851:6
This carbine takes its name from the designer General George Augustus Eliott. It was first approved in June 1773 and was intended for light dragoons. Although a 20 year old design at the onset of the Napoleonic War (1803-1815), it was still in use long after 1815. This is a scarce British Officers private purchase Model 1773 Eliott service carbine that has not been modified in later life and retains all of its original features. The flintlock carbine was made by Mather of Newcastle and is nicely stamped on the side of the lock plate MATHER NEWCASTLE together with 2 line border line engraving as does the cock. The carbine has a 28 inch barrel with an overall length of 44 inches. The carbine has regulation brass mounts, flat side-plate of shaped outline, brass fore-end cap, steel sling bar with ring and the original steel ramrod with characteristic swelling cut with a groove cut near to the head to retain the head. The barrel is nicely stamped with the government proof marks for privately made barrels and has a nice clean bore with light staining due to residue in service. The barrel has a fore sight which also doubles as a stud for the bayonet. See pages 55, 56, 57 & 78 British Military Longarms 1715-1815 by D.W. Bailey, British Military Firearms 1650-1850 by Howard l. Blackmore & chapter 4 in British Cavalry Carbines & Pistols of the Napoleonic Era by Barry Chisnall and Geoffrey Davies. NB As an antique musket no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Delivery is to the U.K. mainland by arrangement and at cost. Sn 21851:6
£7,450.00

**VERY RARE**Transitional C1860’s Victorian English Beatley of Basingstoke Improved Patent .400 Calibre Swivel Breech Loading, Percussion, Internal Firing Pin, Black Powder Rifle. Sn 14573 - 14573
The Hampshire Museums and Archives Service in Winchester has a collection of billheads for the English Gunmaking Beatley family, For example, a bill dated 13 September 1834, was printed with the description: London Street, Basingstoke J. H. Beatley, Gun-Maker Bell Hanger, Brass Worker, etc. and Sole Manufacturer of Brownjohn’s Patent Cap Charger. Percussion and other Fowling Pieces, with London proved Barrels, finished throughout on the most esteemed Principles. Percussion Caps, adapted for the above Chargers of superior Quality. Fishing Apparatus of all Kinds, of the best Manufacture. Articles of Brass Work cleaned and lacquered. Agent for the Portable Oil Gas – fittings neatly and expeditiously executed. Thirty years later, in 1864, Charles Beatley delivered a bill that advertised: London St, Basingstoke Charles Beatley Gun Maker & Fishing Tackle Manufacturer, Tin Man, Whitesmith, Working Cutler & Repairer of Steel Trusses, Archery of Every Description, etc. Percussion & other Fowling Pieces, with London proved Barrels, finished throughout on the most esteemed Principles. Percussion Caps, adapted for the above Chargers of superior Quality. Gun Powder, Shot, etc. Fishing Apparatus of all kinds, of the best Manufacture. Articles of Brass Work cleaned & lacquered. Gas fittings neatly & expeditiously executed. Fitter up of invisible fences in parks, pleasure grounds, gardens etc. and wire working of every description, in brass or iron. Copper and tin ware, in every variety. This is a very rare, transitional improved patent rifle by Beatley of Basingstoke. Little is known about this innovative breech loading internal firing pin black powder rifle. The rifle has a 29 ¾” octagonal barrel and is 47” overall length. It has a clean bore with crisp rifling. It has a block with post fore sight and block with ‘v’ notch plate rear sight. The top of the barrel is engraved ‘Beatley Basingstoke’. The underside of the barrel has black powder proofs. Its original Walnut stock with chequered panel wrist has a steel butt plate with foliate engraved extended tang. The action and trigger guard have quality foliate engraved decoration and the top of the swivelling breech block is engraved ‘improved patent rifle’. The breech is opened for loading by depression of a flat button on a lever on the underside of the action, this allows the breech to be swivelled open by sideways operation of the lever. A percussion cap is then placed on a nipple on one side of the breech chamber and powder bullet / ball and wadding loaded into the other side. The chamber is then closed using the lever. The weapon is cocked by pulling back its cocking lever which has the appearance of a traditional hammer. This lever cocks the internal hammer and is ready for firing. Its loading and firing actions work perfectly. The price for this very rare transitional rifle worthy of further research includes UK delivery. NB as an antique black powder rifle no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 14573
£1,450.00

SOLD SOLD (08/07) ARE FORM**Late 19th Century French MAB Velo-Dog 5.75mm Obsolete Centre Fire Velo Dog Calibre 6 Shot Hammerless Ejector Revolver With Folding Trigger, Period Chamois Leather Holster In Which It Was Found & 1 Inert Deactivated Cartridge. - 21825
The Velo-Dog pistol was a pocket revolver originally created in France by Charles-François Galand in the late 19th century as a defence for cyclists against dog attacks. The name is a portmanteau of "velocipede" and "dog". Surviving examples vary considerably in appearance. All have short barrels. Many of the weapons have a trigger that folds into the body of the weapon when not in use. This is an original Liege 5 shot, Velo-Dog revolver in the UK obsolete 5.75mm Velo Dog Calibre, in excellent condition. It has a fluted cylinder and 2 ¼” barrel (6 ½” overall). The barrel has a blade fore sight and the top of the frame has a ‘v’ notch rear sight. The barrel's bore is near mint, clean and bright with crisp rifling. The metal has all of its original blue finish. It has original, undamaged, chequered panel gutta percha hard rubber grips. Unusually this pistol breaks open for loading by pressing down on a steel lever at the rear of the action (the lever has the appearance of a hammer, but its sole purpose is to open the frame for loading, the firing mechanism on this pistol is internal). The pistol also has an innovative ejector mechanism, operated by a knurled steel lever at the muzzle end of the frame. Its double action only firing mechanism works crisply. The frame has the trade mark of the French manufacturer ‘MAB’ (Manufacture d'Armes de Bayonne). There are no visible date or serial numbers externally visible on the pistol. The pistol comes with its period chamois leather holster in which it was found. The holster has a flap cover with eyelets that fasten to 2 buttons on the front of the holster. The muzzle end of the holster is open. The leather is supple with no damage and has just staining consistent with age and carry. There are no maker or date marks on the holster. All leather and stitching are intact. Also included is a single inert deactivated round of brass cased velo dog ammunition. The headstamp of the case is ‘REM UMC V D’. The price for this superb rare form velo dog set includes UK delivery. NB As an obsolete calibre, antique pistol with inert deactivated cartridge no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as a part of a collection or display. Sn 21825 (drawers office)
£0.00

Extremely Rare, Original, British, George II Era, Pre Land Pattern, 42 Inch Barrel Brown Bess .75” Musket by Buckmaster of London. Sn - 21851:6
This is an extremely rare pre Land Pattern Brown Bess musket by Joseph Buckmaster, a London gunsmith who traded from 1730. Robert Buckmaster obtained the freedom of Gunmakers Company on 11th July 1727 and his proof piece was accepted in 1730. In 1732, he was in business at Preston’s Yard, Hatchet Alley, Towerhill in London. His makers mark was a star over IB. From 1740, there was increasing mention of a short land pattern musket that had started about 1720. The long pattern had a barrel length of 46 inches and the short pattern had a barrel length of 42 inches. The short pattern was fitted with a wooden ramrod. Very few of these pre Land Pattern muskets survive and most are in museums. This is an unmolested example of the Pre Land Pattern 42 Inch Barrel Brown Bess .75” Musket. This musket has a barrel length of 42 inches and an overall length of 58 inches. The stock is carved round the squared off barrel tang and the breech has the baluster turning in front of the tang. The flat 6 ½ inches by 1 ¼ inches long lockplate is signed BUCKMASTER with two line engraving and a small decoration behind the cock. The lock has an early single bridle for the frizzen and is retained by 2 sidenails from the flat brass sideplate. The barrel is London proofed and carries the makers mark star over IB (Robert Buckmaster) between the proof marks which was Josephs Buckmasters mark. The barrel is retained at the breach by a screw from the trigger guard instead of being secured from the top. The stock has a flat brass butt plate and the trigger guard is solid behind the curled trigger. The brass tipped ash ramrod is retained by 3 ram rod ferrules. Where the ramrod enters the stock, there is no ferrel fitted as on late models, only a plain wooden ram rod channel. The musket is stocked to 2 ¾ inches form the muzzle with a simple small rectangular block foresight. Brass nosecaps were generally added after 1750. There is a blank oval brass escutcheon fitted to the top of the wrist. The barrel is smooth with a nice patina and the bore has staining and residue with use. The lock has a strong and crisp action. The walnut stock is in a nice condition with no cracks with only minor knocks and bumps with age and at some stage it has had an contempory old small inlet repair to the fore end top which has been nicely done. At some time the guns original swan necked cock has been replaced with an India pattern ring neck cock usually due to the fragility of the swan necked cock and probably long service of the gun as the sides of the wooden butt have been contemporary decorated with small brass nails with Waterloo on the right hand side and Salamanca on the left hand side. See Great British Gunmakers, 1540 – 1740 by W. Keith Neal & D.H.L. Back, page 453, British Military Longarms 1715-1815 by D.W. Bailey and British Military Firearms 1650-1850 by Howard l. Blackmore. Delivery is to the U.K. mainland by arrangement and at cost. Sn 21851:6
£7,450.00

19th Century Ottoman Empire 24 Bore Miquelet Lock Rifle With Octagonal Barrel, Tiger Stripe Olive Or Palm Wood Stock, Silvered Hand Tooled Decoration, Action & Barrel Arabic Gunsmith / Family Signatures & Ram Rod. Sn 15226 - 15226
Miquelet lock is a modern term used by collectors and curators, largely in the English-speaking world, for a type of firing mechanism used in muskets and pistols. It is a distinctive form of snaplock, originally as a flint-against-steel ignition form, once prevalent in Spain, Portugal, Italy, the Balkans, North Africa, the Ottoman Empire and throughout Spain's colonies from the late 16th to the mid 19th Centuries. The miquelet may have come to the attention of arms makers in Istanbul & North Africa via long-established trade routes from Italian city-states through the port of Ragusa (Dubrovnik) to provinces on the Balkan Peninsula. Other avenues were probably provided by booty from corsair raids and/or from the many Ottoman-Euro conflicts of the period. The muzzle loading weapons were generally handmade weapons, and consequently they widely varied in their construction. They were seen as very personal weapons, and unlike the typical military weapons of the time which were very plain and utilitarian, the weapons tended to be well crafted and were usually intricately decorated. The stocks were handmade and ornately decorated. This is a 19th century miquelet lock musket in the form found in the Ottoman Empire in that era. It measures 48” overall length. It has an octagonal 34" long steel sighted barrel which is 14.93 mm muzzle diameter (approx. 24 Bore). The bore has staining consistent with age and crisp well defined rifling. The barrel & action have Arabic roundels most likely gunsmith and or family name. It has steel barrel bands. The hammer and action have ornate silvered decoration. The weapon has its original steel ram rod. Its original Olive or Palm wood stock has an attractive Tiger stripe hue and bone or Ivory inlays. The stock has old stable repairs. It has a steel ball end trigger on the underside of the stock. The butt is mounted with decorative metal plates. The wood and metal have the wear and patina to be expected of a native weapon of its age. The rifle cocks and dry fires but due to age and condition it is advised that this action is not performed to avoid damage to the action. The price includes UK delivery. NB As an antique miquelet musket no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 15226
£895.00

**NAPOLEONIC WARS ERA** Extremely Rare, Original, Quality, British, Henry Nock, Screwless Lock. Duke of Richmond’s Pattern Musket, Short Land Pattern, 39 inch Barrel, Brown Bess .75 inch Calibre, Smooth Bore Musket. Sn - 21851:5
This is an original, Quality, unmessed with British, Henry Nock Short Duke of Richmond’s Pattern Short Land Pattern Musket, 39 inch barrel Brown Bess .75 inch calibre musket fitted with a Nock Screwless Lock. This musket is modelled on the Duke of Richmond’s pattern musket made between 1794 and 1797 in 2 variations with 42 inch barrels. This musket measures 55 inches overall with a barrel length of 39 inches. The barrel has and has 2 London proof marks stamped on side of the breach with HN (Henry Nock) stamped between them. The breech plug also has a sighting groove in it. The patent Nock lock lockplate is engraved on the side H NOCK and has 2 line engraving round it. The original muskets were made with 4 ram rod tubes. This is a short land pattern Brown Bess musket made to the Short Land Pattern with 3 ram rod tubes and a steel ramrod. The barrel is retained by 3 flat steel wedges instead of round pins. The butt is fitted with the short land pattern butt plate and the lock is retained by a flat side plate with 3 screws in it. The cocking and firing mechanism work as they should with a strong spring pressure. The bore has staining and residue with use. The quality walnut stock is in a nice condition with no cracks and has only minor knocks and bumps with age. This is nice untouched example of an Henry Nock screwless lock Brown Bess short land pattern musket. See British Military Longarms 1715-1815 by D.W.Bailey and British Military Firearms 1650-1850 by Howard l. Blackmore. New evidence from surviving prototypes illustrates the development of the rare musket that has become known as the ‘Duke of Richmond’s Musket’. The need for large quantities of arms to fight the wars with France resulted in the abandonment of this excellent gun in favour of the lower quality but much faster to make India Pattern Musket, and afterwards many Duke of Richmond Muskets were converted to conventional locks and then lost in the Tower of London fire of 1841. Only a handful of examples exist today. See British Military Longarms 1715-1815 by D.W.Bailey and British Military Firearms 1650-1850 by Howard l. Blackmore. Delivery is to the U.K. mainland by arrangement and at cost. Sn 21851:5
£6,750.00
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