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Victorian British 16th The Queen's Lancers Officer’s Lance Cap / Chapka With Gilt Fittings, Silvered Queen’s Crown Plate, With Pre Boer War Battle Honours Bullion Rosette & Black Cock's Tail Feather Plume. Sn 14666:7 - 14666:7
The 16th The Queen's Lancers was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army, first raised in 1759. It saw service for two centuries, before being amalgamated with the 5th Royal Irish Lancers to form the 16th/5th Lancers) in 1922. The Regiment was raised in 1759 by Colonel John Burgoyne as the 16th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, being the second of the new Regiments of Light Dragoons; it was also known as Burgoyne's Light Horse. The Regiment was closely involved, undertaking several cavalry charges, in the action leading up to the capture of the French Garrison of Belle Île in April 1761 during the Seven Years' War. It also made a major contribution to the British victories against the Spaniards at the Battle of Valencia de Alcántara in August 1762 and at the Battle of Vila Velha in October 1762 during the Anglo-Spanish War. In 1766 the Regiment was renamed after Queen Charlotte as the 2nd (or The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, the number being an attempt to create a new numbering system for the Light Dragoon Regiments. However, the old system was quickly re-established, with the Regiment returning as the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons in 1769. The Regiment arrived in New York in October 1776 for service in the American Revolutionary War. It was involved in fighting at the Battle of White Plains in October 1776, the Battle of Brandywine in September 1777 and the Battle of Germantown in October 1777 before seeing more action at the Battle of Crooked Billet in May 1778, the Battle of Barren Hill later that month and the Battle of Monmouth in June 1778. The Regiment returned to England in spring 1779. The Regiment next landed at Ostend in April 1793 for service in the Flanders Campaign and was present at the Siege of Valenciennes in June 1793, the Siege of Dunkirk in August 1793 and the Siege of Landrecies in April 1794. It also took part in the Battle of Beaumont in April 1794, the Battle of Willems in May 1794 and the Battle of Tournay in later that month before returning to England in February 1796. The Regiment was then based in Ireland between autumn 1802 and 1805. During the Napoleonic Wars the Regiment were ordered to support Sir Arthur Wellesley's Army on the Iberian Peninsula and landed at Lisbon in April 1809. The Regiment fought at the Second Battle of Porto in May 1809, the Battle of Talavera in July 1809 and the Siege of Ciudad Rodrigo in April 1810. The Regiment also saw action at the Battle of Bussaco in September 1810 the Battle of Sabugal in April 1811 and the Battle of Fuentes de Oñoro in May 1811. It next fought at the Battle of Salamanca in July 1812, the Siege of Burgos in September 1812 and the Battle of Vitoria in June 1813. It was next in action at the Siege of San Sebastián in August 1813 and having advanced into France, at the Battle of Nivelle in November 1813. The regiment took part in the Hundred Days landing at Ostend in May 1815. It charged with John Vandeleur's Cavalry Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815. After the battle, their commander, Lieutenant-colonel James Hay, lay so badly injured that he could not be moved from the field for eight days. The Regiment had been the sole British Cavalry Regiment to serve throughout the Peninsular War and at the Hundred Days. In the Victorian era, the Regiment was dispatched to Ireland in March 1816 where it was re-designated as a Lancer Regiment in September 1816, becoming the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons (Lancers). It returned from Ireland in June 1819 and was sent to India in 1822 where it saw action, using lances, against the Marathas at the Siege of Bharatpur in January 1826. It saw action again at the capture of Ghuznee in July 1839 during the First Anglo-Afghan War and at the Battle of Maharajpore in December 1843 during the Gwalior Campaign. It also took part in the Battle of Aliwal in January 1846, when the Regiment charged and dispersed a body of Sikhs ten times its size, and also fought at the Battle of Sobraon in February 1846 during the First Anglo-Sikh War. The Regiment’s title was simplified to the 16th (The Queen's) Lancers in 1861. It served in India between 1865 and 1876 and again between 1890 and 1899. Prior to the Boer Wars 1899-1902 the Regiment was awarded Battle Honours: Talavera, Fuentes d'Onor, Salamanca, Vittoria, Nive, Peninsula, Waterloo, Bhurtpore, Ghuznee 1839, Afghanistan 1839, Maharajpore, Aliwal, Sobraon. This is a scarce, original, Cavalry Officer’s Lance Cap of the 16th The Queen's Lancers (see multiple entries including pages 77 to 80 of the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman which illustrates & describes, in detail, the components & construction of Lance caps & Victorian 16th Lancer’s plates similar to ours). The Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, skull and peak of black patent leather with waist of Gold lace and red band. The rear has the correct gilt metal ring & hook with 4 leaf mount. The peak is adorned with gold purl. The cloth top and sides are covered in black cloth of the Regimental facing colour. Gold cord extends across the top of the cap and down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct bullion ‘VR (Victoria Regina) rosette on a field of red and Lion’s head bosses with velvet backed link chain. It has a brass plume boss with dramatic correct black Cock's tail feather plume. The cap is fitted with the correct Victorian gilt metal rayed plate and silvered badge comprising the correct Victorian Crown Royal arms & correct pre Boer War Battle honours above banner ‘Sixteenth Lancers’. The Lance Cap is complete with original leather sweat band and silk liner which has become detached. The sweatband is complete but has service wear to be expected. The cap is approx UK size 6 1/2. The price for this impressive Lance Cap to a Prestigious Lancer’s Regiment includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:7
£3,750.00

Post 1902 British 16th The Queen's Lancers Trooper’s Lance Cap / Chapka With King’s Crown Plate & Pre WW1 Battle Honours, Rosette,Black Horse Hair Plume & Lines. Sn 14666:8 - 14666:8
The 16th The Queen's Lancers was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army, first raised in 1759. It saw service for two centuries, before being amalgamated with the 5th Royal Irish Lancers to form the 16th/5th Lancers) in 1922. The Regiment was raised in 1759 by Colonel John Burgoyne as the 16th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, being the second of the new Regiments of Light Dragoons; it was also known as Burgoyne's Light Horse. The Regiment was closely involved, undertaking several cavalry charges, in the action leading up to the capture of the French Garrison of Belle Île in April 1761 during the Seven Years' War. It also made a major contribution to the British victories against the Spaniards at the Battle of Valencia de Alcántara in August 1762 and at the Battle of Vila Velha in October 1762 during the Anglo-Spanish War. In 1766 the Regiment was renamed after Queen Charlotte as the 2nd (or The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, the number being an attempt to create a new numbering system for the Light Dragoon Regiments. However, the old system was quickly re-established, with the Regiment returning as the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons in 1769. The Regiment arrived in New York in October 1776 for service in the American Revolutionary War. It was involved in fighting at the Battle of White Plains in October 1776, the Battle of Brandywine in September 1777 and the Battle of Germantown in October 1777 before seeing more action at the Battle of Crooked Billet in May 1778, the Battle of Barren Hill later that month and the Battle of Monmouth in June 1778. The Regiment returned to England in spring 1779. The Regiment next landed at Ostend in April 1793 for service in the Flanders Campaign and was present at the Siege of Valenciennes in June 1793, the Siege of Dunkirk in August 1793 and the Siege of Landrecies in April 1794. It also took part in the Battle of Beaumont in April 1794, the Battle of Willems in May 1794 and the Battle of Tournay in later that month before returning to England in February 1796. The Regiment was then based in Ireland between autumn 1802 and 1805. During the Napoleonic Wars the Regiment were ordered to support Sir Arthur Wellesley's Army on the Iberian Peninsula and landed at Lisbon in April 1809. The Regiment fought at the Second Battle of Porto in May 1809, the Battle of Talavera in July 1809 and the Siege of Ciudad Rodrigo in April 1810. The Regiment also saw action at the Battle of Bussaco in September 1810 the Battle of Sabugal in April 1811 and the Battle of Fuentes de Oñoro in May 1811. It next fought at the Battle of Salamanca in July 1812, the Siege of Burgos in September 1812 and the Battle of Vitoria in June 1813. It was next in action at the Siege of San Sebastián in August 1813 and having advanced into France, at the Battle of Nivelle in November 1813. The regiment took part in the Hundred Days landing at Ostend in May 1815. It charged with John Vandeleur's Cavalry Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815. After the battle, their commander, Lieutenant-colonel James Hay, lay so badly injured that he could not be moved from the field for eight days. The Regiment had been the sole British Cavalry Regiment to serve throughout the Peninsular War and at the Hundred Days. In the Victorian era, the Regiment was dispatched to Ireland in March 1816 where it was re-designated as a Lancer Regiment in September 1816, becoming the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons (Lancers). It returned from Ireland in June 1819 and was sent to India in 1822 where it saw action, using lances, against the Marathas at the Siege of Bharatpur in January 1826. It saw action again at the capture of Ghuznee in July 1839 during the First Anglo-Afghan War and at the Battle of Maharajpore in December 1843 during the Gwalior Campaign. It also took part in the Battle of Aliwal in January 1846, when the Regiment charged and dispersed a body of Sikhs ten times its size, and also fought at the Battle of Sobraon in February 1846 during the First Anglo-Sikh War. The Regiment’s title was simplified to the 16th (The Queen's) Lancers in 1861. It served in India between 1865 and 1876 and again between 1890 and 1899. Prior to the Boer Wars 1899-1902 the Regiment was awarded Battle Honours: Talavera, Fuentes d'Onor, Salamanca, Vittoria, Nive, Peninsula, Waterloo, Bhurtpore, Ghuznee 1839, Afghanistan 1839, Maharajpore, Aliwal, Sobraon. During the Boer wars 1899-1902 the Regiment landed at Cape Colony in January 1900 for service in the Second Boer War and took part in the relief of Kimberley in February 1900. This is a scarce, original, Cavalry Trooper’s Lance Cap of the 16th The Queen's Lancers (see multiple entries in the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman which illustrates & describes, in detail, the components & construction of Lance caps & page 96 which illustrates a 16th Lancers KC plate, the same as ours). The Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, skull and peak of black patent leather with waist of yellow cloth and red band. The rear has the correct brass metal ring & hook with 4 leaf mount. The cloth sides are covered in black cloth of the Regimental facing colour. Yellow cord with brass finials extends down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct green and yellow wool ball rosette with Kings Crown ‘QL XVI’ (Queens 16th Lancers) button and Lion’s head bosses with leather backed link chain. It has a brass plume boss with black horse hair plume. The cap is fitted with the correct King’s Crown metal rayed plate and badge comprising the correct Royal arms & pre WW1 battle Honours above banner ‘Sixteenth Lancers’. The Lance Cap is complete with original leather sweat band liner. The crown of the cap has a size label 6 5/8. The size is repeated in contemporary white paint on the liner. The cap has its original Lines. The price for this impressive Lance Cap to a Prestigious Lancer’s Regiment includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:8
£1,575.00

'DEATH OR GLORY' Post 1902 British WD 17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own) Trooper’s Lance Cap / Chapka With King’s Crown Plate & Pre WW1 Battle Honours, Rosette, White Horse Hair Plume & Lines. Sn 14666:9 - 14666:9
The 17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own) was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army, notable for its participation in the heroic Charge of the Light Brigade during the Crimean War. The Regiment's famous motto was 'Death Or Glory'. In 1759, Colonel John Hale of the 47th Foot was ordered back to Britain with General James Wolfe's final dispatches and news of his victory in the Battle of Quebec in September 1759. After his return, he was rewarded with land in Canada and granted permission to raise a Regiment of Light Dragoons. He formed the Regiment in Hertfordshire on 7 November 1759 as the 18th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, which also went by the name of Hale's Light Horse. The admiration of his men for General Wolfe was evident in the cap badge Colonel Hale chose for the regiment: the Death's Head with the motto "Or Glory". The Regiment fought in the American War of Independence. In 1806, the Regiment took part in the disastrous expeditions to Spanish-controlled South America, then an ally of France during the Napoleonic Wars The Regiment was sent to India shortly after returning home. It took part in the attack on the Pindarees in 1817 during the Third Anglo-Maratha War. While in India, the British Army nominally re-classified the Regiment as Lancers and added "Lancers" as a subtitle to its Regimental designation in 1822. In 1826, Lord Bingham (later the 3rd Earl of Lucan) became the Regiment's Commanding Officer when he bought its Lieutenant-Colonelcy for the reputed sum of £25,000 pounds. During his tenure, Bingham invested heavily in the Regiment, purchasing uniforms and horses, giving rise to the Regimental nickname "Bingham's Dandies". During the Crimean war, the Regiment landed at Calamita Bay near Eupatoria in September 1854 and saw action, as part of the Light Brigade under the command of Major General the Earl of Cardigan, at the Battle of Alma in September 1854. The Regiment, commanded by Captain William Morris, was in the first line of Cavalry on the left flank during the Charge of the Light Brigade at the Battle of Balaclava in October 1854. The brigade drove through the Russian artillery before smashing straight into the Russian Cavalry and pushing them back; it was unable to consolidate its position, however, having insufficient forces and had to withdraw to its starting position, coming under further attack as it did so. The Regiment lost 7 officers and 67 men in the heroic action. The Regiment went on to take part in the Siege of Sevastopol in winter 1854. After the inception of the Victoria Cross in 1856, three members of the Regiment received the award for acts of gallantry in the charge. In the Victorian era, 1857 the Regiment arrived in India to reinforce the effort to suppress the Indian rebellion against British rule. The Regiment returned to England in 1865.[ The Regiment became the 17th Regiment of Lancers in August 1861. When, in 1876, it gained Prince George, Duke of Cambridge as its colonel-in-chief, the Regiment adopted the title of the 17th (The Duke of Cambridge's Own) Lancers. The Regiment was sent to Natal Colony for service in the Anglo-Zulu War and fought at the Battle of Ulundi in 1879. The Regiment returned to India the same year, remaining there until about 1890 when they returned to England. In March 1900 a contingent from the Regiment, was deployed to South Africa for service in the Second Boer War. The contingent's most significant action was at the Battle of Elands River (Modderfontein) in September 1901. This is a scarce, original, Cavalry Trooper’s Lance Cap of the 17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own). See multiple entries in the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman which illustrates & describes, in detail, the components & construction of Lance caps & page 138 which illustrates a 17th Lancers KC plate, the same as ours. The Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, peak of black patent leather , white patent leather top, waist of yellow cloth and black band. The rear has the correct brass metal ring & hook with 4 leaf mount. It has the correct white melton cloth sides. Yellow cord with brass finials extends down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct green and yellow wool ball rosette with ‘skull and crossed bones’ 17th Lancers button and Lion’s head bosses with leather backed link chain. It has a brass plume boss with white horse hair plume. The cap is fitted with the correct King’s Crown metal rayed plate and badge comprising the correct Royal arms, Skull & Crossed Bones’ device with banner ‘Or Glory’ & pre WW1 battle Honours above banner ‘Seventeenth Lancers’. The Lance Cap is complete with original leather sweat band & cloth liner. The liner has service wear to be expected. The sweat band has a contemporary white paint size marking 6 7/8. The crown of the cap has ink stamps ‘WD with arrow’ and ‘2 Years’. The cap is fitted with original Lines. The price for this impressive Lance Cap to a Prestigious Lancer’s Regiment includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:9
£1,675.00

Victorian British 16th The Queen's Lancers Officer’s Lance Cap / Chapka By Sexton, Dublin With Gilt Fittings, Silvered Queen’s Crown Plate, With Pre Boer War Battle Honours, Bullion Rosette & Cock’s Tail Feather Plume. - 14666:10
The 16th The Queen's Lancers was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army, first raised in 1759. It saw service for two centuries, before being amalgamated with the 5th Royal Irish Lancers to form the 16th/5th Lancers) in 1922. The Regiment was raised in 1759 by Colonel John Burgoyne as the 16th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, being the second of the new Regiments of Light Dragoons; it was also known as Burgoyne's Light Horse. The Regiment was closely involved, undertaking several cavalry charges, in the action leading up to the capture of the French Garrison of Belle Île in April 1761 during the Seven Years' War. It also made a major contribution to the British victories against the Spaniards at the Battle of Valencia de Alcántara in August 1762 and at the Battle of Vila Velha in October 1762 during the Anglo-Spanish War. In 1766 the Regiment was renamed after Queen Charlotte as the 2nd (or The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, the number being an attempt to create a new numbering system for the Light Dragoon Regiments. However, the old system was quickly re-established, with the Regiment returning as the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons in 1769. The Regiment arrived in New York in October 1776 for service in the American Revolutionary War. It was involved in fighting at the Battle of White Plains in October 1776, the Battle of Brandywine in September 1777 and the Battle of Germantown in October 1777 before seeing more action at the Battle of Crooked Billet in May 1778, the Battle of Barren Hill later that month and the Battle of Monmouth in June 1778. The Regiment returned to England in spring 1779. The Regiment next landed at Ostend in April 1793 for service in the Flanders Campaign and was present at the Siege of Valenciennes in June 1793, the Siege of Dunkirk in August 1793 and the Siege of Landrecies in April 1794. It also took part in the Battle of Beaumont in April 1794, the Battle of Willems in May 1794 and the Battle of Tournay in later that month before returning to England in February 1796. The Regiment was then based in Ireland between autumn 1802 and 1805. During the Napoleonic Wars the Regiment were ordered to support Sir Arthur Wellesley's Army on the Iberian Peninsula and landed at Lisbon in April 1809. The Regiment fought at the Second Battle of Porto in May 1809, the Battle of Talavera in July 1809 and the Siege of Ciudad Rodrigo in April 1810. The Regiment also saw action at the Battle of Bussaco in September 1810 the Battle of Sabugal in April 1811 and the Battle of Fuentes de Oñoro in May 1811. It next fought at the Battle of Salamanca in July 1812, the Siege of Burgos in September 1812 and the Battle of Vitoria in June 1813. It was next in action at the Siege of San Sebastián in August 1813 and having advanced into France, at the Battle of Nivelle in November 1813. The regiment took part in the Hundred Days landing at Ostend in May 1815. It charged with John Vandeleur's Cavalry Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815. After the battle, their commander, Lieutenant-colonel James Hay, lay so badly injured that he could not be moved from the field for eight days. The Regiment had been the sole British Cavalry Regiment to serve throughout the Peninsular War and at the Hundred Days. In the Victorian era, the Regiment was dispatched to Ireland in March 1816 where it was re-designated as a Lancer Regiment in September 1816, becoming the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons (Lancers). It returned from Ireland in June 1819 and was sent to India in 1822 where it saw action, using lances, against the Marathas at the Siege of Bharatpur in January 1826. It saw action again at the capture of Ghuznee in July 1839 during the First Anglo-Afghan War and at the Battle of Maharajpore in December 1843 during the Gwalior Campaign. It also took part in the Battle of Aliwal in January 1846, when the Regiment charged and dispersed a body of Sikhs ten times its size, and also fought at the Battle of Sobraon in February 1846 during the First Anglo-Sikh War. The Regiment’s title was simplified to the 16th (The Queen's) Lancers in 1861. It served in India between 1865 and 1876 and again between 1890 and 1899. Prior to the Boer Wars 1899-1902 the Regiment was awarded Battle Honours: Talavera, Fuentes d'Onor, Salamanca, Vittoria, Nive, Peninsula, Waterloo, Bhurtpore, Ghuznee 1839, Afghanistan 1839, Maharajpore, Aliwal, Sobraon. This is a scarce, original, Cavalry Officer’s Lance Cap of the 16th The Queen's Lancers (see multiple entries including pages 77 to 80 of the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman which illustrates & describes, in detail, the components & construction of Lance caps & Victorian 16th Lancer’s plates similar to ours). The Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, skull and peak of black patent leather with waist of Gold lace and red band. The rear has the correct gilt metal ring & hook with 4 leaf mount. The peak is adorned with gold purl. The cloth top and sides are covered in black cloth of the Regimental facing colour. Bullion cord extends across the top of the cap and down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct bullion ‘VR (Victoria Regina) rosette on a field of red and Lion’s head bosses with velvet backed link chain. It has a brass plume boss with dramatic Cock’s tail Feather plume. The cap is fitted with the correct Victorian gilt metal rayed plate and silvered badge comprising the correct Victorian Crown Royal arms & correct pre Boer War Battle honours above banner ‘Sixteenth Lancers’. The Lance Cap is complete with original leather sweat band and silk liner which are in excellent condition. The lining has a manufacturer’s/ Retailer’s gold leaf stamp ‘R, Sexton Military Tailor 51 Dawson Street Dublin’ indicating that the cap itself may have been commissioned by the original Lancer Officer who owned this cap when stationed in or visiting Dublin. The cap is approx UK size 6 1/2. The price for this impressive Lance Cap to a Prestigious Lancer’s Regiment includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:10 **NB THE 16th LANCERS OFFICER'S UNIFORM THAT WAS ACQUIRED WITH THIS LANCE CAP IS AVAILABLE SEPARATELY (STOCK NUMBER SN 14666:11). A DISCOUNT IS AVAILABLE IF THE LANCE CAP AND UNIFORM ARE PURCHASED TOGETHER. PLEASE CONTACT FOR DETAILS**
£3,950.00

SOLD SOLD 16th Queen's Lancers Officer’s Uniform Scarlet Tunic & Blue Cavalry Trousers By Sandilands & Son London To A.D.R. Wingfield Esq, Post 1902 KC Buttons, Bullion & Sterling Silver Adornments, Including Victorian Silver Patch Box, Belts & Lines. - 14666:11
The 16th The Queen's Lancers was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army, first raised in 1759. It saw service for two centuries, before being amalgamated with the 5th Royal Irish Lancers to form the 16th/5th Lancers) in 1922. This is an original uniform of the 16th The Queen's Lancers. The scarlet tunic with blue breast has bullion piping to the blue cuffs. The high collar with bar hook is blue, edged with gold lace. The epaulettes have heavy embroidered bullion entwined rope. The rear has bullion piped edging. The tunic has the correct post 1902 King’s Crown ‘QL 16’ Regimental embossed buttons. The back of the buttons are stamped by the manufacturer ‘Jennens London’. One of the front buttons is absent. The body of the Tunic and lining are clean with just the service wear to be expected with age. The Tunic is approx UK size 38" chest. The tunic is fitted with original leather backed bullion cross belt with red band, sterling silver hall marked mounts, chain and sterling silver hall marked patch box with gilt Victorian Crown and stylised ‘VR’ (Victoria Regina) monogram. The tunic also has its original bullion lines and silk backed gold bullion waist belt with red bands. The belt has lace eyelets and bullion barrel buttons. One button is absent. The Navy blue Cavalry trousers have yellow tape to the legs, raised waistband, buttoned fly and leather boot straps with buckles at the ankle. All buttons are present. They are approx UK size waist 30", inside leg 32". All material is clean & undamaged. The inside of the trousers has a clean undamaged label ‘Sandilands & Son 12 Conduit St, London W’ The label has contemporary handwritten name ‘A.D.R Wingfield Esq’ no doubt the name of the Lancer’s Officer who commissioned this uniform together with numbers ‘57’ and ‘228’. The price for this colourful Lancer’s Uniform with Victorian sterling silver hall marked patch box and mounts worthy of further research regarding the hallmarks and named Lancer’s Officer includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:11 **NB THE VICTORIAN OFFICER’S, 16th LANCERS, LANCE CAP THAT WAS ACQUIRED WITH UNIFORM IS AVAILABLE SEPARATELY (STOCK NUMBER SN 14666:10). A DISCOUNT IS AVAILABLE IF THE UNIFORM AND LANCE CAP ARE PURCHASED TOGETHER. PLEASE CONTACT FOR DETAILS**
£0.00

SOLD SOLD (20/11) Late Victorian, Post 1898, British 21st (Empress Of India’s) Lancers Trooper’s Lance Cap / Chapka, Queens Crown Plate With Later WW1 Era King’s Crown ‘GRV’ Button Rosette, White Horse Hair Plume & Lines. Sn 14666:12 - 14666:12
The 21st Lancers (Empress of India's) was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army, raised in 1858 and amalgamated with the 17th Lancers in 1922 to form the 17th/21st Lancers. Perhaps its most famous engagement was the Battle of Omdurman, where Winston Churchill (then an officer of the 4th Hussars), rode with the unit. The Regiment was originally raised in Bengal by the East India Company in 1858 as the 3rd Bengal European Light Cavalry, for service in the Indian Rebellion. As with all other "European" units of the Company, it was placed under the command of the British Crown in 1858, and formally moved into the British Army in 1862, when it was designated as a Hussar Regiment and titled the 21st Regiment of Hussars. A detachment saw service in the 1884–85 expedition to the Sudan, with the Light Camel Regiment. In 1898 the Regiment served in Sudan during the Mahdist War, as the only British Cavalry unit involved. It was there that the full Regiment charged with Lances in the classic cavalry style during the Battle of Omdurman in September 1898. Of less than 400 men involved in the charge 70 were killed or wounded and the Regiment won three Victoria Crosses. This spectacular encounter earned considerable public attention and praise for the Regiment. That same year, the Regiment was given the title 21st (Empress of India's) Lancers, taking the name from Queen Victoria who was the Empress of India. The Regiment was moved to Dublin in 1899, and served in Ireland for several years. In 1912 it was again posted to India. The 21st Lancers did not see service on the Western Front during the First World War, being the only regular Cavalry Regiment of the British Army to spend the duration of the war in India. The Regiment did however see action on the North-West Frontier during 1915–16. A single squadron made up of reservists served in France in 1916–17, attached to XIV Corps. The Regiment was retitled 21st Lancers (Empress of India's) in 1921 and shortly thereafter disbanded as part of the post-War reduction in forces, though a cadre was briefly resurrected in 1922 in order to amalgamate with the 17th Lancers, to form the 17th/21st Lancers. This is an original, Victorian Trooper’s Lance Cap of the 21st (Empress of India's) Lancer’s (see pages 87 & 103 of the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman which illustrates examples of 21st Empress Of India’s Officer’s & Trooper’ s Lance caps). Our Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, skull and peak of black patent leather with correct yellow cloth waistband. The inside has part of its original leather sweatband and original liner which is present but perished. The crown has ink stamped numbers ‘55’ & ‘00’. The rear has the correct brass ring & hook with 4 leaf mount. The sides are covered in the correct blue facing cloth. Yellow twisted rope piping with ornate brass finials extends down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct wool ball rosette with later WW1 era Kings Crown ‘GRV’ Royal cypher (King George V Rex) brass button and Lion’s head bosses with correct leather backed link brass chain. It has a brass plume boss with correct white horse hair plume. The cap is fitted with original cord lines and correct rayed plate and badge comprising the Queen’s Crown Royal arms & honour ‘Khartoum’ above combined ‘VRI’ cypher (Victoria Regina India) and banners 21st (Empress Of India’s) Lancers. The cap is approx UK size 6 1/2. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:12
£0.00

Victorian, Pre 1899, British 21st Lancers Officer’s Lance Cap / Chapka By Cater & Co London, 1st Pattern Queens Crown Silvered Plate With Late Victorian ‘VRI’ Bullion Rosette, White Swan Feathers Plume. Sn 14666:13 - 14666:13
The 21st Lancers Regiment was originally raised in Bengal by the East India Company in 1858 as the 3rd Bengal European Light Cavalry, for service in the Indian Rebellion. As with all other "European" units of the Company, it was placed under the command of the British Crown in 1858, and formally moved into the British Army in 1862, when it was designated as a Hussar Regiment and titled the 21st Regiment of Hussars. A detachment saw service in the 1884–85 expedition to the Sudan, with the Light Camel Regiment. In 1898 the Regiment served in Sudan during the Mahdist War, as the only British Cavalry unit involved. It was there that the full Regiment charged with Lances in the classic cavalry style during the Battle of Omdurman in September 1898. Of less than 400 men involved in the charge 70 were killed or wounded and the Regiment won three Victoria Crosses. This spectacular encounter earned considerable public attention and praise for the Regiment. That same year, the Regiment was given the title 21st (Empress of India's) Lancers, taking the name from Queen Victoria who was the Empress of India. The Regiment was moved to Dublin in 1899, and served in Ireland for several years. In 1912 it was again posted to India. The 21st Lancers did not see service on the Western Front during the First World War, being the only regular Cavalry Regiment of the British Army to spend the duration of the war in India. The Regiment did however see action on the North-West Frontier during 1915–16. A single squadron made up of reservists served in France in 1916–17, attached to XIV Corps. The Regiment was retitled 21st Lancers (Empress of India's) in 1921 and shortly thereafter disbanded as part of the post-War reduction in forces, though a cadre was briefly resurrected in 1922 in order to amalgamate with the 17th Lancers, to form the 17th/21st Lancers. This is an original, Victorian Officer’s Lance Cap of the 21st Lancer’s made prior to re-naming as the 21st (Empress Of India’s) Lancer’s (see pages 27,31,166 of the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman and page 139 which illustrates a 1st pattern Officer’s 21st lancer’s plate, the same as ours). Our Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, peak and body of black patent leather and are adorned with gold purl decoration. The top and sides have Regimental blue cloth covering with correct gold lace waistband. The inside has its original leather sweatband and silk lining in excellent condition. The crown has a gold leaf tailors stamp ‘Cater & Co 56 Pall Mall London Established 1776’ below Crown VR (Victoria Regina) Royal cypher (illustrated). The rear has the correct brass ring & hook with 4 leaf mount. Bullion rope piping extends across the top of the cap & down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct late Victorian bullion rosette with stylised ‘VRI’ cypher (Victoria Regina India) applied in the late Victorian era post 1898 after renaming of the Regiment. It has Lion’s head bosses with correct velvet backed link brass chain. It has a brass plume boss with correct white Swan’s feathers plume. The cap has its original rayed plate and silvered 1st pattern badge comprising the Queen’s Crown Royal arms and banners 21st Lancers (1st pattern badges have the helmet and mantling above the Royal arms). The cap is approx UK size 6 1/2. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:13
£3,950.00

SOLD (20/11) ONE OF ONLY 14 MADE**Post 1952 British Presentation Lancers Bandsman’s Lance Cap / Chapka With Queen’s Crown Plate & Black Horse Hair Plume Presented By The Band Association 17/21st Lancers With Presentation Certificate. Sn 14666:14 - 14666:14
The 17th/21st Lancers was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army. It was formed in England by the amalgamation of the 17th Lancers and the 21st Lancers in 1922 and, after service in the Second World War, it amalgamated with the 16th/5th The Queen's Royal Lancers to form the Queen's Royal Lancers in 1993. This quality made presentation Lancers Bandsman’s cap was one of only 14 produced using traditional methods and were commissioned by The Band Association 17/21st Lancers. Chapter 9 of the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman which illustrates & describes, in detail the construction & Plates of Bandsman’s Lance caps & page 113 which illustrates a Bandsman’s plate similar to ours. The Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, peak and top of black patent leather, waist of yellow cloth and red band. The rear has the correct gilt brass metal ring & hook with 4 leaf mount. It has the correct red cloth sides. Yellow cord with gilt finials extends down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct red and yellow rosette with ‘skull and crossed bones’ gilt button and gilt Lion’s head bosses with leather backed link chain. It has a brass plume boss with black horse hair plume. The cap is fitted with the correct metal rayed plate and badge comprising Queen’s crown Royal arms, Skull & Crossed Bones’ device with banner ‘Or Glory’ (as worn by the 17th Lancers at the Charge of The Light Brigade in the Crimean war) above banner ‘ Lancers Band’. The Lance Cap is complete with original leather sweat band liner. The cap is approx. UK size 7 ½. The price for this near mint Lance Cap to a includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:14
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