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Aeronautica

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Cast Duralumin Photograph Frame and Photograph Of Kapitan Max Pruss Made From Remains Of The Airframe Of The German Hindenburg D-LZ 129 Zepplin Which Crashed In New Jersey USA 6th May 1937. Sn 13708 - 13708
Max Pruss was the captain of the Hindenburg when it crashed at Lakehurst, New Jersey on 6th May 1937. Captain Pruss received his airship training in the German Navy during WW1 and served as an elevator man on the German Navy Zeppelins L6 (LZ-31), L11 (LZ-41), L25 (LZ-58), L30 (LZ-62), and L54 (LZ-99). Pruss then worked with Eckener and fellow zeppelin officers Hans von Schiller, Hans Flemming, and Anton Wittemann giving lectures around Germany to raise money for the Zeppelin-Eckener-Spende and the construction of LZ-127 Graf Zeppelin. Pruss served aboard Graf Zeppelin during many important flights, including the ship’s historic 1929 Round-the-World flight, and was given command of Graf Zeppelin in 1934. He served as a watch officer aboard Hindenburg during many flights of the 1936 season along with fellow watch officers Albert Sammt, Heinrich Bauer, and Knut Eckener under the command of both Hugo Eckener and Ernst Lehmann. Pruss himself eventually received command of Hindenburg, and he was the ship’s captain on the transatlantic flight from Lakehurst to Frankfurt on 30th September – 3rd October 1936, and during Hindenburg’s last three South American crossings of the 1936 season. Max Pruss was in command of Hindenburg when it was destroyed by fire at Lakehurst, New Jersey on 6th May 1937. He survived the crash, but suffered very serious burns on much of his body, including his face whilst repeatedly trying to save passengers from the burning remains, and remained in a New York hospital for many months. To the end of his life, Pruss believed the Hindenburg disaster was the result of sabotage. This is a very rare piece, it is made from recycled Duralumin from the airframe remains of the burnt out Hindenburg D-LZ 129. It is cast in one piece and has a very nice hinged back and stand as can be seen from the photographs. It measures 10 1/2" x 8 1/2". On the front it has two brass plates which are nicely stamped, the top one has "Kapitan Max Pruss" and the bottom one has "Hindenburg D-LZ 129 6. Mai 1937 Aufgearbeiteten (Recycled) Duralumin". The back plate is held with a rotating cam and the back of the photograph has a Blue ink stamp "From Acme Newspictures Inc Cleveland Bureau 1200 West Third St. Please Credit Ame Phot This picture is sold to you for your publication only and must not be loaned syndicated for advertising purposes without written permission from us" and a further one "Ref Dept. N.E.A." along with a signature "Capt. Max Pruss" in pencil and "A11424" in pencil. The photograph is black and white and is of Max Pruss in uniform. This is a very nice piece and very collectable for anyone with and interest in the Hindenburg disaster and Zeppelins. The price includes UK shipping. Sn 13708
£495.00

WW1 French 'Lafayette Escadrille' Air Force Large feathered Flechette, Number Stamped '284'. Sn 13696 - 13696
This is a WW1 French Air Force 'Lafayette Escadrille' large feathered Flechette. This is the rarer type of flechette as most are all steel. A flechette is a pointed steel projectile, with a vaned tail for stable flight. The name comes from French fléchette, "little arrow" or "dart", and sometimes retains the acute accent in English: fléchette. They were dropped onto cavalry Troops, into the trenches and anywhere they could cause damage. This large flechette was designed probably to penetrate observation balloons and Zeppelins before the incendiary rounds were brought into use in aircraft. They were very effective. This flechette has a feathered tail and hexagonal steel dart. The steel dart is stamped with "284" and the '8' has been over stamped over an original '3'. The dart is very sharp with a pencil point. They were very effective if dropped in numbers. They are rare to find in this condition as any flechette's dropped buried themselves into the ground if they didn't find a target. This flechette weighs 450grams. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13696
£475.00

Original, WW1 Era Royal Flying Corps (RFC) 2 Tail Message Streamer With Message Pocket & Original Weight. Sn 13335 - 13335
These streamers with 2 tails were made from stitched segments of coloured cloth with a small pocket at the end to take the message and a weight. They were dropped from aircraft By RFC Pilots over aerodromes and troops in the trenches in order to supply reconnaissance information to those on the ground. Examples of these streamers can be seen at Hawking, RAF Hendon, RAF Cosford Aerospace museums and also at the warfare museum within Edinburgh Castle. This example has an overall length of 52” and the tails are 4 /14” wide. It has the correct message pocket with button which contains its original iron weight. There are no visible date or manufacturer marks on the streamer or weight. All material and stitching are intact. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13335
£225.00

WW2 Royal Air Force 'Bakelite' Recognition Model of a German Heinkel HE III MK V. Sn 13246:1 - 13246:1
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Bakelite model of a German Heinkel HE III MK V and is finished in matt black. If there was an aircraft that had done more damage regarding strategic bombing during the Battle of Britain, it was the Heinkel He 111. The Heinkel He 111 was a German aircraft designed by Siegfried and Walter Günter at Heinkel Flugzeugwerke in 1934. Through development it was described as a "wolf in sheep's clothing" because the project masqueraded the machine as civilian transport, though from conception the Heinkel was intended to provide the nascent Luftwaffe with a fast medium bomber. Perhaps the best-recognised German bomber due to the distinctive, extensively glazed "greenhouse" nose of later versions, the Heinkel He 111 was the most numerous Luftwaffe bomber during the early stages of World War II. The bomber fared well until the Battle of Britain, when its weak defensive armament was exposed. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Royal Observer Corps as ground gun crews and observers also needed to positively identify enemy aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers. On the bottom it has a moulded "HE III MK V". It measures 13" wingspan. There is a small drilled hole through the centre of the fuselage which was to thread cord through to hang the model from the ceiling to replicate the model in flight. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13246:1
£275.00

Royal Air Force Recruiting Centre Swing Wing Tornado GR1 Desktop Aircraft Model By Space Models of Feltham, On a Display Stand. Sn 13245 - 13245
This is a very nice scale model of the RAF Swing Wing Tornado Gr1 mounted on a stand for display. It was as used in RAF Recruiting Centres throughout the UK. It is in very good condition. The wings swing as they should and the model is very nicely produced. Space Models are one of Europe's leading model and plastic prototype manufacturers since 1947 and has worked for many of the worlds leading companies. This is a very unusual model of the Tornado and would look good in any collection or on any desk for display. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13245
£195.00

WW2 Royal Air Force & Royal Observer Corps 'Bakelite' Recognition Model of a Boulton Paul Defiant. Sn 13248 - 13248
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Bakelite model of a Bolton Paul Defiant and is finished in matt black. The Boulton Paul Defiant was a British interceptor aircraft that served with the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. The Defiant was designed and built by Boulton Paul Aircraft as a "turret fighter", without any forward-firing guns. It was a contemporary of the Royal Navy's Blackburn Roc. The concept of a turret fighter related directly to the successful First World War era Bristol F.2 Fighter. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Army as ground gun crews also needed to positively identify enemy aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers. On the bottom it has the word "Defiant" moulded on the underside. It measures 6 3/4" wingspan. There is a small drilled hole through the centre of the fuselage which was to thread cord through to hang the model from the ceiling to replicate the model in flight. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13248
£165.00

WW2 Royal Air Force & Royal Observer Corps 'Bakelite' Recognition Model of a Fairey Fulmar. Sn 13250:1 - 13250:1
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Bakelite model of a Fairey Fulmar and is finished in matt black. The Fairey Fulmar was a British carrier-borne fighter aircraft that served with the Fleet Air Arm (FAA) during the Second World War. A total of 600 were built by Fairey Aviation at its Stockport factory between January 1940 and December 1942. The Fulmar's design was based on that of the earlier Fairey P.4/34 that was in turn developed in 1936 as a replacement for the Fairey Battle light bomber. Although its performance (like that of its Battle antecedent) was lacking, the Fulmar was a reliable, sturdy aircraft with long range and an effective armament of eight machine guns. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Army as ground gun crews also needed to positively identify enemy aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers. On the bottom it has the word "Fulmar" moulded on the underside. It measures 8" wingspan. There is a small drilled hole through the centre of the fuselage which was to thread cord through to hang the model from the ceiling to replicate the model in flight. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13250:1
£175.00

WW2 Royal Air Force & Royal Observer Corps 'Bakelite' Recognition Model of a German Junkers 88. Sn 13246 - 13246
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Bakelite model of a German Junkers 88 and is finished in matt black. The Junkers Ju 88 was a German World War II Luftwaffe twin-engined multirole combat aircraft. Designed by Junkers Flugzeug- und Motorenwerke in the mid-1930s. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Army as ground gun crews also needed to positively identify enemy aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers. On the bottom it has a moulded "JU 88". It measures 10" wingspan. There is a small drilled hole through the centre of the fuselage which was to thread cord through to hang the model from the ceiling to replicate the model in flight. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13246
£225.00

Scarce WW2 Royal Air Force & Royal Observer Corps 'Buckram' Recognition Model of a Short Sterling. Sn 13252 - 13252
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Buckram made model of a Short Sterling and is finished in matt black. The Short Stirling was the first four-engined British heavy bomber of World War II. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Army as the Air Observer Corps and gun crews also needed to positively identify friendly aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers and as such this buckram model is scarce. On the bottom it has a sticker saying "Stirling" and a white painted "Mall 3". It measures 16" wingspan. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13252
£245.00

WW2 German Luftwaffe Framed Parachute Silk Fragment From A HE111 P-H Shot Down In Birmingham 19th November 1940. Sn 13271 - 13271
This is an original WW2 German Luftwaffe Pilot/Aircrew Parachute silk fragment from a 'shot down' Heinkel HE111 P-H. This parachute fragment was recovered from the crash site of a Heinkel bomber which was shot down in Birmingham by A.A. fire on the night of 19th November 1940. The aircraft wreckage was recovered on 22nd September 1985 at Workshop Farm, Wolvey, Warwickshire. From research the Heinkel had a crew of four, Oblt. H. Klawe (Pilot, Killed), Obgf X. Nirschel (Killed U/Gunner), FW W. Gutekunst (Taken Prisoner), X.Uffz R. Zeitz (Taken Prisoner). This information is on a card in the bottom centre of the fram, see the close up photograph. The fragment of parachute is mounted behind glass and a thin frame. The frame measures 20 1/2 x 16 1/2". The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13271
£195.00
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