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SOLD SOLD (18/9) WW2 Battle Of Britain Royal Air Force 'C' Type Leather Flying Helmet, Size 7 1/8"-7 3/8" Complete With Full Wiring Loom. Sn 14481 - 14481
A superb WW2 Battle Of Britain era, un-touched condition Air Ministry 'C' type flying helmet, complete with full wiring loom including ear phones, microphone and plug. The helmet leather is in a very supple condition, showing signs of honest service use only and now appearing dark tan / brown in colour. It has a hand written name in white "Payne" across the forehead. All straps and buckles are present and in good matching order. The interior of helmet shows light use, wear and sweat staining. In all an excellent original helmet, becoming harder to find especially in this condition. The archetypal WW2 RAF flying helmet, much used during the ’Battle of Britain’. The wiring loom has two ear phones attached and wired up for use along with the large 'jack' plug and microphone. Both ear phones have the War Department Kings Crown and "AM" and the microphone is stamped with "Ref No 10A/12570 On Off". An excellent original and complete Type 'C' British Battle of Britain flying helmet. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 14481
£0.00

WW2 1939 Battle Of Britain Era Royal Air Force 'B' Type Leather Flying Helmet By Frank Bryan Size 6 1/2"-6 3/4". Sn 14480 - 14480
A WW2 Battle Of Britain era, un-touched condition Air Ministry 'B' type flying helmet, complete with large maker label. The helmet leather is in a very supple condition, showing very light honest service use only and now appearing dark tan / brown in colour. It is sized inside on a label to 6 1/2" - 6 3/4". All straps and buckles are present and in good matching order. The interior of helmet shows light use, wear. It has a silk maker label present giving details "Size 1 6 1/2" to 6 3/4 A.M. 22c-65 Made by Frank Bryan Limited London & Worcester 1939". Below this is an ink stamp with "Aid GT9" inside a circle. In all an excellent helmet, becoming harder to find especially in this condition. The archetypal WW2 RAF flying helmet, much used during the ’Battle of Britain’. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 14480
£395.00

WW2 Battle of Britain Desk Identification Spitfire & Bristol Blenheim Along With Pilot Posing With a Two Blade Propeller. Sn 14407 - 14407
WW2 Battle of Britain Desk identification Spitfire & Bristol Blenheim along with pilot posing with a two blade propeller. The first identification desk aeroplane is a chromed brass Spitfire on a lightning bolt stand. It is in very good original condition. It has a wing span of 5 3/4" and stands 5 1/4" high. The second is a chromed brass Bristol Blenheim Light fighter / bomber, also on a similar lightening bolt stand. It has a wing span of 8 3/4" and stands 6 3/4" high. The figure is a typical WW2 British pilot in flying kit with a pose holding a two bladed propeller. The figure maybe resin but is finished with an alloy paint. It stands 11" high. The three desk display items would make a great gift and would make a very nice desk display. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 14407
£295.00

Original, WW1 Era Royal Flying Corps (RFC) 2 Tail Message Streamer With Message Pocket & Original Weight. Sn 13335 - 13335
These streamers with 2 tails were made from stitched segments of coloured cloth with a small pocket at the end to take the message and a weight. They were dropped from aircraft By RFC Pilots over aerodromes and troops in the trenches in order to supply reconnaissance information to those on the ground. Examples of these streamers can be seen at Hawking, RAF Hendon, RAF Cosford Aerospace museums and also at the warfare museum within Edinburgh Castle. This example has an overall length of 52” and the tails are 4 /14” wide. It has the correct message pocket with button which contains its original iron weight. There are no visible date or manufacturer marks on the streamer or weight. All material and stitching are intact. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13335
£225.00

WW2 Royal Air Force 'Bakelite' Recognition Model of a German Heinkel HE III MK V. Sn 13246:1 - 13246:1
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Bakelite model of a German Heinkel HE III MK V and is finished in matt black. If there was an aircraft that had done more damage regarding strategic bombing during the Battle of Britain, it was the Heinkel He 111. The Heinkel He 111 was a German aircraft designed by Siegfried and Walter Günter at Heinkel Flugzeugwerke in 1934. Through development it was described as a "wolf in sheep's clothing" because the project masqueraded the machine as civilian transport, though from conception the Heinkel was intended to provide the nascent Luftwaffe with a fast medium bomber. Perhaps the best-recognised German bomber due to the distinctive, extensively glazed "greenhouse" nose of later versions, the Heinkel He 111 was the most numerous Luftwaffe bomber during the early stages of World War II. The bomber fared well until the Battle of Britain, when its weak defensive armament was exposed. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Royal Observer Corps as ground gun crews and observers also needed to positively identify enemy aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers. On the bottom it has a moulded "HE III MK V". It measures 13" wingspan. There is a small drilled hole through the centre of the fuselage which was to thread cord through to hang the model from the ceiling to replicate the model in flight. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13246:1
£275.00

WW2 Royal Air Force & Royal Observer Corps 'Bakelite' Recognition Model of a Boulton Paul Defiant. Sn 13248 - 13248
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Bakelite model of a Bolton Paul Defiant and is finished in matt black. The Boulton Paul Defiant was a British interceptor aircraft that served with the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. The Defiant was designed and built by Boulton Paul Aircraft as a "turret fighter", without any forward-firing guns. It was a contemporary of the Royal Navy's Blackburn Roc. The concept of a turret fighter related directly to the successful First World War era Bristol F.2 Fighter. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Army as ground gun crews also needed to positively identify enemy aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers. On the bottom it has the word "Defiant" moulded on the underside. It measures 6 3/4" wingspan. There is a small drilled hole through the centre of the fuselage which was to thread cord through to hang the model from the ceiling to replicate the model in flight. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13248
£165.00

WW2 Royal Air Force & Royal Observer Corps 'Bakelite' Recognition Model of a Fairey Fulmar. Sn 13250:1 - 13250:1
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Bakelite model of a Fairey Fulmar and is finished in matt black. The Fairey Fulmar was a British carrier-borne fighter aircraft that served with the Fleet Air Arm (FAA) during the Second World War. A total of 600 were built by Fairey Aviation at its Stockport factory between January 1940 and December 1942. The Fulmar's design was based on that of the earlier Fairey P.4/34 that was in turn developed in 1936 as a replacement for the Fairey Battle light bomber. Although its performance (like that of its Battle antecedent) was lacking, the Fulmar was a reliable, sturdy aircraft with long range and an effective armament of eight machine guns. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Army as ground gun crews also needed to positively identify enemy aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers. On the bottom it has the word "Fulmar" moulded on the underside. It measures 8" wingspan. There is a small drilled hole through the centre of the fuselage which was to thread cord through to hang the model from the ceiling to replicate the model in flight. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13250:1
£175.00

WW2 Royal Air Force & Royal Observer Corps 'Bakelite' Recognition Model of a German Junkers 88. Sn 13246 - 13246
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Bakelite model of a German Junkers 88 and is finished in matt black. The Junkers Ju 88 was a German World War II Luftwaffe twin-engined multirole combat aircraft. Designed by Junkers Flugzeug- und Motorenwerke in the mid-1930s. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Army as ground gun crews also needed to positively identify enemy aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers. On the bottom it has a moulded "JU 88". It measures 10" wingspan. There is a small drilled hole through the centre of the fuselage which was to thread cord through to hang the model from the ceiling to replicate the model in flight. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13246
£225.00

Scarce WW2 Royal Air Force & Royal Observer Corps 'Buckram' Recognition Model of a Short Sterling. Sn 13252 - 13252
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Buckram made model of a Short Sterling and is finished in matt black. The Short Stirling was the first four-engined British heavy bomber of World War II. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Army as the Air Observer Corps and gun crews also needed to positively identify friendly aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers and as such this buckram model is scarce. On the bottom it has a sticker saying "Stirling" and a white painted "Mall 3". It measures 16" wingspan. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13252
£245.00

A Superb Print Of 2 Spitfires By Robert Taylor & Signed By Douglas bader & Jonnie Johnson. Sn 13258 - 13258
This is a stunning print from 1970 by Robert Taylor, considered to be one of the best aviation artists of the 20th Century. It depicts 2 Spitfires flying high over a coastline and captures the grace and elegance of these iconic planes. It is titled "Spitfire" by Robert Taylor in the bottom margin. Either side of this are the signatures of two of the most famous fighter aces of WW2, Douglas Bader and Johnnie Johnson. The print is double mounted with a 19" x 15" window. A stunning print with signatuers of 2 famous WW2 Spitfire aces. Mounted ready for framing. Please note this has been photographed through a thick cellophane covering which has reflected the light in places. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13258
£350.00
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