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SOLD SOLD SOLD Victorian Era Zulu Warrior’s Wire Bound Tropical Hard Wood Assegai Stabbing Spear Mounted With Black Bull’s Tail. Sn 14168 - 14168
The Assegai is a short handled stabbing spear invented by the legendary Zulu king Shaka in the early 1800s. The weapon revolutionized tribal warfare in Southern Africa. This Assegai measures 46 ½” overall length. It’s iron 8” long elegant leaf shaped blade with medial ridge has a 5” tang securely attached to its hand crafted tropical hard wood shaft by intricate copper or brass wire binding. The lower end of the shaft is mounted with a piece of black Bulls tail hide complete with thick black hair tuft and leather. The bulbous butt of the shaft is hand carved with a geometric design. The heavy butt could also be used to strike an opponent during battle. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 14168
£0.00

Victorian Era Zulu Warrior’s Wire Bound Tropical Hard Wood Assegai Stabbing Spear With Remnants Of Original Cow Hide Cover. Sn 14167 - 14167
The Assegai is a short handled stabbing spear invented by the legendary Zulu king Shaka in the early 1800s. The weapon revolutionized tribal warfare in Southern Africa. This Assegai measures 49 ½” overall length. It’s iron 5 ¼” long elegant leaf shaped blade has a round 7 ½” tang securely attached to its hand crafted tropical hard wood shaft by intricate iron wire binding. The bottom end of the shaft has a ½” section of iron wire binding and an 11” section of its original cow hide covering which is worn consistent with age and use. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 14167
£450.00

**SOLD**SOLD**Victorian Era Zulu Warrior’s Wire Bound Tropical Hard Wood Assegai Stabbing Spear. Sn 14166 - 14166
The Assegai is a short handled stabbing spear invented by the legendary Zulu king Shaka in the early 1800s. The weapon revolutionized tribal warfare in Southern Africa. The Assegai measures 40 ½” overall length. It’s Steel 8” long elegant leaf shaped blade with medial ridge has a square section 4” tang securely attached to its hand crafted tropical hard wood shaft by intricate copper or brass wire binding. The tang has naïve hand tooled decoration on 2 sides. The bottom end of the shaft has a 3 ¾” section of copper and brass wire binding and the end of the shaft has a heavy hand carved stylised seed pod butt which could also be used for striking an opponent during combat. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 14166
£0.00

**SOLD**SOLD**RARE, Victorian Era Zulu Warrior’s Wire Bound Tropical Hard Wood War Axe. Sn 14165 - 14165
The Zulu Axe was a close combat weapon. The handle could also be used for blocking, while the shape of the blade would have allowed the user to hook an enemy's weapon. This is an original Victorian Era Zulu War Axe. The Axe measures 29” in length overall. It has a heavy iron leaf shaped axe head which is 4 ¾” width at its widest point with 4” long triangular tang which basses through the top end of the 29” long tropical hardwood shaft. The pointed end of the shaft forms a deadly 1” spike protruding through the rear of the shaft head. The hand crafted shaft has three 2 ¼” sections of intricate heavy iron wire binding. The head of the shaft is curved with rear ridge and resembles a stylised snake’s head. The shaft head also naïve hand carved cross panel decoration. The price for this original Victorian era Zulu Warrior’s weapon includes UK delivery. Sn 14165
£0.00

Victorian Hand Crafted African Zulu Warrior’s Wire Bound Tropical Hard Wood Knobkerrie / War Club. Sn 14164 - 14164
A 19th Century Zulu Warrior’s knobkerrie. Knobkerrie, also spelled knopkierie or knobkerry, are clubs used mainly in Southern and Eastern Africa. Typically they have a large knob at one end and can be used for throwing at animals in hunting or for clubbing an enemy's head. This knobkerrie is hand crafted from a tropical hard wood to form the knob and create the shaft. The club measures 21 ½” in length. The bulbous ‘hammer’ head is 3 ¼” diameter & would create devastating injuries if used as a weapon. The shaft has two 4 ¼” long sections of intricate heavy metal wire binding which appears to be a combination of iron and copper. The bottom end of the shaft is holed and fitted with 2 ¾” diameter iron ring for hanging from a shield or waist cord or fitting of a wrist cord. The price includes delivery. Sn 14164
£575.00

SOLD SOLD SOLD RARE, ORIGINAL, Victorian Hand Crafted African Zulu Warrior’s Ingubha (Cow Hide) Umbumbuluzo War Shield With Removable Tropical Hardwood Staff. W 671 - W 671 / 14163
A cow-hide shield is known as ingubha in Zulu. War shields were traditionally stockpiled by a chief or king, to whom they belonged. True war shields are made of raw cattle hide, the shields, which are more than mere commodities for physical protection also acted as status symbols or Coat of Arms for a family or tribe. Consequently King Shaka meted out serious punishment to warriors who lost them. A warrior's duty was to return his shield to the king as a matter of honour and patriotism – to leave them in enemy hands or on foreign soil brought ill fame. The large war shield, of about 5 feet in length, is known as an isihlangu, which means "to brush aside" It was king Shaka's shield of choice, and he intended his warriors to use it in an offensive way by hooking the opponent's shield during hand-to-hand fighting. The umbumbuluzo was also a war shield, but only smaller up to 3½ feet in length. This is a rare, original, Victorian era Zulu Warrior’s umbumbuluzo Ingubha (Cow Hide) war shield. The oval shield measures 28 ½” x 18 ½”. The centre length of the shield has inserted section s of hide to create strength and identify a family or tribe. The rear has triangular hide flaps which hold the original removable tropical hardwood staff / shaft which acts both as a staff for foraging and fighting and when inserted as a handle for the shield. The staff is undamaged and measures 54” length. The top of the staff has 2 hand carved bulbous roundels and the bottom end is crafted into a dull point. The rear of the shield has a copper wire hanging loop with ringed ends, which have no doubt been with this piece since being brought back from Africa during the Victorian era. The price for this rare piece which would make a great addition to any ethnic or Zulu war collection includes UK delivery. W 671
£0.00

SOLD SOLD SOLD (LAY-AWAY) Victorian Hand Crafted African Zulu Warrior Chief’s Tropical Hard Wood Symbol Of Seniority / Knobkerrie Made From The Heart Wood (Strongest Part) In Twisted Wood Form Later Made Into A Gentleman’s Walking Stick. Sn 14004 - 14004
A Circa 19th Century Zulu Warrior Chief’s knobkerrie war club / symbol of authority, seniority or rank. These were used mainly in Southern and Eastern Africa. Typically they have a large knob at one end and can be used for throwing at animals in hunting or for clubbing an enemy's head and the symbol of rank is denoted by the twisted branch form of the shaft. This knobkierie is hand crafted from the ‘heart wood’ (strongest part of the tree) of a tropical hard wood tree to form the knob and crafted to create the twisted form shaft. The club measures 33 ¼” in length. The bulbous ‘hammer’ head is 1 ½” diameter. The well defined heart wood can clearly be seen in image 2. The polished shaft and hammer head are in excellent condition, free of damage. At some point in its life a conical brass cap has been mounted on the end of the shaft to create a gentleman’s walking stick. The price includes delivery. Sn 14004
£0.00

Victorian Hand Crafted African Zulu Warrior’s Large Tropical Hard Wood Knobkerrie / War Club Formed From The Heart Wood (Strongest Part) Of The Tree. Sn 13862 - 13862
A Circa 19th Century Zulu Warrior’s large knobkerrie. Knobkerrie, also spelled knopkierie or knobkerry, are clubs used mainly in Southern and Eastern Africa. Typically they have a large knob at one end and can be used for throwing at animals in hunting or for clubbing an enemy's head. This knobkierie is hand crafted from the ‘heart wood’ (strongest part of the tree) of a tropical hard wood tree to form the knob and crafted to create the shaft. The club measures 28” in length. The bulbous ‘hammer’ head is 3 ½” diameter & would create devastating injuries if used as a weapon. The well defined heart wood can clearly be seen in image 2. The polished shaft and hammer head are in excellent condition, free of damage. The price for this large knobkerrie includes delivery. Sn 13862
£395.00

Early 1900's African Masai Lion Spear With Long 54cm Leaf Shaped Blade With Raised Medial Ridge , Short Central Haft And Spike Butt. Sn 13653 - 13653
Early 1900's African Masai Lion stabbing spear with 54cm long steel leaf shaped blade (73" overall length) weighing 1.9 kg. A spear is a pole weapon used for stabbing with iron or fire-hardened tip. The use of various types of the spear was widespread all over Africa and it was the most common weapon used before the introduction of firearms. The Zulu and other Nguni tribes of South Africa were renowned for their use of the spear. The spear was not only the most commonest weapon in Africa but was also used as a form of currency, tribes smelting iron spear heads traded the spear heads to their less skilful neighbours. This weapon has a 54 mm (21 1/4") long blade with a medial ridge along it's length, it is 33" including the socket for the haft. It has a short central 6" visible haft and a further iron 33" stabbing pike butt. The iron blade and spike are 'forced fit' onto the haft. The haft is plain hard wood and has been hand worked with a linear pattern. This is a very nice example. (See 'A Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and Use of Arms and Armour in all Countries and in All Times' book by George Cameron Stone, Pages 572-573). The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13653
£275.00

Early 1900's African Masai Lion Spear With Long 78mm Blade With Raised Medial Ridge , Short Central Haft And Spike Butt. Sn 13652 - 13652
Early 1900's African Masai Lion stabbing spear with 78mm long steel blade (74" overall length) weighing 1.7 kg. A spear is a pole weapon used for stabbing with iron or fire-hardened tip. The use of various types of the spear was widespread all over Africa and it was the most common weapon used before the introduction of firearms. The Zulu and other Nguni tribes of South Africa were renowned for their use of the spear. The spear was not only the most commonest weapon in Africa but was also used as a form of currency, tribes smelting iron spear heads traded the spear heads to their less skilful neighbours. This weapon has a 78 cm (30 3/4") long blade with a medial ridge along it's length, it is 37" including the socket for the haft. It has a short central 7" visible haft and a further iron 30" stabbing pike butt. The iron blade and spike are 'forced fit' onto the haft. The haft is plain hard wood. This is a very nice example. (See 'A Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and Use of Arms and Armour in all Countries and in All Times' book by George Cameron Stone, Pages 572-573). The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13652
£275.00
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