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Spanish Civil War Era Spanish Air Force Pilot Officer’s Dress Dagger Marked ‘FN’ & Crown (Fabrica Nacional), Scabbard & Chain Hangers With Bullion Belt. (ED 2229 Daggers & Swords) - ED 2229
This is an original Spanish Air Force Officer's dress dagger set as issued to during the Spanish civil war era 1936 to 1939. The dagger obviously influenced by Nazi German Luftwaffe daggers of that era has a 37cm long double edged blade marked on one side with the combined ‘FN’ and crown mark (Fabrica Nacional). The blade has stable areas of light pitting but retains much of its original polish and is totally secure. The blade has its original hilt washer. The dagger has the correct distinctive cross guard, decorated on one side with the Spanish Air Force 'winged crown' and on the reverse with Spanish heraldic arms and Eagle. It has its original deep orange hue wire bound ivorine grip with ornate ferrule and pommel. The hilt mounts retain most of their original gilt finish and the wire binding on the grip is tight and intact. The dagger measures 49.5cm overall length. Its original gilt scabbard has 2 hanging ring mounts with ornate decoration and Oak leaf panel near to the tip of the scabbard. The mounts are fitted with original hanging rings and chain hangers with hanging hook and sprung clip. Also included is its original bullion faced belt with gilt Spanish Airforce emblem & Oak leaf wreath embossed buckle. The belt is 5cm wide and 103cm long. The belt is clean and undamaged. The price includes UK delivery. ED 2229
£375.00

MATCHING NUMBERS, Swiss Army, Schmidt-Rubin Model 1889 7.5 x 53.5 mm Straight Pull Rifle With Sling. A 591 - A 591
In 1882 Eduard Rubin began testing the first small-calibre copper-jacketed bullet which could successfully withstand high velocities. In 1885, this round was combined with Rudolf Schmidt's first straight-pull action resulting in the Swiss, Schmidt-Rubin Model 1889 7.5 x 53.5 mm Rifle. This is an excellent example. It measures 51 ½” overall with a 31" barrel and has all original woodwork. The stock is stamped with a Swiss Military mark ‘D6+CI’ and the steel butt plate with 'Swiss Cross' together with numbers ‘4’ and ‘422’. The metal work retains its original bluing. The breech housing is stamped with Swiss proof/ inspection marks and matching serial numbers '154422' on the breech housing, barrel and magazine. It is complete with bayonet bar, sling swivels with original leather sling, adjustable rear sight and block & blade fore sight. It’s cocking & firing action works perfectly as it should and its barrel has a clean bore with crisp rifling. Price includes UK delivery. NB As an obsolete calibre antique firearm no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. A 591
£745.00

FORERUNNER OF THE BRITISH ARMY MARTINI HENRY SERVICE RIFLE, Mid 1800’s Martini Tanner & Co, Martini’s Patent No. 2425 Action .41 Swiss Calibre Sporting / Target Rifle. Sn 14715 - 14715
The Hungarian born Swiss Friederich Martini is famous for developing the Peabody rifle (Peabody-Martini) and in collaboration with the Scotsman Alexander Henry designing the Martini- Henry rifle that the British army used from 1871 till 1891. Before taking part in the British Army trials that led to his action being adopted by the British Armed Forces, Martini worked with Tanner & Co to create their Martini Patent No 2425 action, Stutzen rifle (Martini Tanner & Co worked together from 1833 to 1897, the Company was in existence until C1916). This is an excellent example of the Martini Tanner & Co Stutzen in .41 Swiss calibre made prior to the British Military Trials. The Stutzen walnut stock is all original, excellent and undamaged. It has a curved steel butt plate with finials typically Swiss of that era, two sling swivels and steel ramrod. It has a 32 ½”round stepped to octagonal blued steel barrel with adjustable rear sight and block and blade fore sight. The left side of the barrel is numbered 3435. The barrel’s bore is clean with crisp rifling. The left side of the action is marked ‘Martini’s Patent 2425’, the right ‘Martini Tanner & Co Frauenfeld’. The rifle measures 48 ¾” overall length. Its loading and firing actions work as they should. The price for this excellent rifle worthy of further research includes UK delivery. NB As an obsolete calibre, antique firearm no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 14715
£1,200.00

WW1 Imperial German Artillery Officer’s Sword With Etched Blade & Scabbard. Sn 14667:12 - 14667:12
This is an original, WW1 Era, German Artillery Officer’s Sword & Scabbard (see pages 199 and 204 of World Swords by Withers for similar WW1 German Artillery Swords). The Sword is in very good condition. It has a single edged, fullered, curved, 30” blade. Both sides of the blade are etched with a foliate design incorporating Martial banners and arms and cannons. The back edge of the blade is decorated with Oak leaves. The blade has just light staining consistent with age. Its cross guard, knuckle guard, pommel are undamaged. The black paint of its wood grip with finger grooves has areas of wear to be expected but is intact and secure. The Sabre is complete with its original steel scabbard with 2 hanging rings. The scabbard with small shoe has no dents and just even light staining to be expected of a sword scabbard of this age. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 14667:12
£295.00

SOLD...SOLD...SOLD...WW1 U.S. Army & WW2 British WD Home Guard Issue Winchester 'Lend lease' P14 .303 Calibre Rifle**UK/EU DEACTIVATION CERTIFICATED**. Sn 14718 - 14718
This is a very good WW2, 'Lend Lease' Winchester .303 calibre P14 Rifle. These rifles used by American Forces in WW1 were refurbished in British .303 Calibre under the terms of the 'lend-lease' agreement during WW2 and issued to British Home Guard Units. The woodwork has the knocks bumps and bruises to be expected with age and service use. The metal work is undamaged. The right side of the frame is stamped with serial number 'W' (Winchester) 8606'. It is also stamped with WD arrow mark & British inspection mark on the left side. The rifle is fitted with a flip up rear sight and winged fore sight. It has a steel butt plate with trap, sling swivels and bayonet lug. Deactivated to UK/EU specification, the weapon, cocks & dry fires perfectly. Price includes UK/EU deactivation certificate and UK delivery. Sn 14718
£375.00

WW2, Single Decal, Luftwaffe M42 Steel Combat Helmet With Liner & Chin Strap. Sn 8139 - 8139
An excellent original single decal, WW2, Luftwaffe steel combat helmet. It has no dents & all rivets are in place together with it's chin strap bales. The helmet retains it's most of it's Dark Grey Paint and has it's original brown leather liner and chinstrap with buckle. The left of the helmet features the dramatic Luftwaffe Eagle in flight with Swastika Decal. The Eagle decal is in nice condition with great original colour. The helmet is stamped on the inside rim 'bk2 2079' and is approx UK size 7. As with all of our stock this item is guaranteed 100% genuine. Price for this Luftwaffe helmet includes UK delivery. Sn 8139
£875.00

Early 1900's 5th Royal Irish Lancer's Officer’s Lance Cap / Chapka With Gilt Fittings, Silvered King’s Crown Plate, ER VII With Pre Boer War Battle Honours Bullion Rosette With Green Swan’s Feather Plume. Sn 14666:1 - 14666:1
**PART OF A LIFETIME'S COLLECTION** The 5th Royal Irish Lancers was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army. It saw service for three Centuries, including the First World War and the Second World War. It amalgamated with the 16th The Queen's Lancers to become the 16th/5th Lancers in 1922. The Regiment was originally formed in 1689 by Brigadier James Wynne as James Wynne's Regiment of Dragoons. It fought at the Battle of the Boyne in July 1690 and at the Battle of Aughrim later that month under King William III. Renamed the Royal Dragoons of Ireland in 1704, it went on to fight under the Duke of Marlborough at the Battle of Blenheim in August 1404 during the War of the Spanish Succession. At the Battle of Ramillies in May 1606 the regiment helped capture the entire French “Regiment du Roi”, after which it fought at the Battle of Oudenarde in July 1708 and at the Battle of Malplaquet in September 1709. In 1751, it was retitled 5th Regiment of Dragoons and in 1756 it became the 5th (or Royal Irish) Regiment of Dragoons. As such, it served in Ireland and had the honour of leading the charge against the rebels at the Battle of Enniscorthy in May 1798 during the Irish Rebellion of 1798. However, its troops were accused of treachery, their accusers claimed their ranks had been infiltrated by rebels. Following an investigation, it was found that a single individual, James M’Nassar, had infiltrated the Regiment, he was ordered to be "transported beyond the seas”. The circumstance was commemorated in a curious way. It was ordered that the 5th Royal Irish Light Dragoons should be erased from the records of the army list, in which a blank between the 4th and 6th Dragoons should remain forever, as a memorial of disgrace. For upward of half a century this gap remained in the army list. The Regiment was reformed in 1858, keeping its old number and title, but losing precedence, being ranked after the 17th Lancers. It was immediately converted into a Lancer Regiment and titled 5th (or Royal Irish) Regiment of Dragoons (Lancers). In 1861, it was renamed the 5th (or Royal Irish) Lancers and then the 5th (Royal Irish) Lancers. The Regiment served in India between November 1863 and December 1874 and a contingent joined the Nile Expedition in autumn 1884. It then fought against the forces of Osman Digna near Suakin in 1885 during the Mahdist War. The Regiment fought at the Battle of Elandslaagte on 21 October 1899, at the Battle of Rietfontein on 24 October 1899 and at the Siege of Ladysmith in November 1899 during the Second Boer War. The Regiment, as part of the 3rd Cavalry Brigade, was also involved in the Curragh incident in March 1914. At the outbreak of WW1 The Regiment became part of the British Expeditionary Force, sailing from Dublin to France as part of the 3rd Cavalry Brigade in the 2nd Cavalry Division in August 1914 for service on the Western Front. The 5th (Royal Irish) Lancers also has the grim honour of being the Regiment of the last British soldier to die in the Great War. This was Private George Edwin Ellison from Leeds, who was killed by a sniper as the Regiment advanced into Mons a short time before the armistice came into effect. The Regiment was renamed 5th Royal Irish Lancers and disbanded in 1921, but a squadron was reconstituted in 1922 and immediately amalgamated with the 16th The Queen's Lancers to become the 16th/5th Lancers. The Regiment was awarded the following Battle honours prior to WW1, Blenheim, Ramillies, Oudenarde, Malplaquet, Suakin 1885, Defence of Ladysmith, South Africa 1899–1902. This is a scarce, original, Cavalry Officer’s Lance Cap of the 5th Royal Irish Lancer's (see pages 38 to 47 of the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman which illustrates & describes, in detail, the components & construction of a Post 1902 Officer’s 5th Royal Irish Lance cap similar to ours). The Lance Cap has the correct skull and peak of black patent leather with waist of Gold lace. The rear has the correct gilt metal ring & hook with 4 leaf mount. The peak is adorned with 3 stripes of gold purl. The cloth top and sides are covered in cloth of the Regimental facing colour, being supported on the inside by a framework of metal rods. Gold cord extends across the top of the cap and down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct bullion ‘ER VII’ (Edward VII Rex) rosette on a field of green and lion’s head bosses with correct leather backed link chain. It has a brass plume boss with dramatic Green Swan’s Feather plume. The cap is fitted with the correct post 1902 gilt metal rayed plate and 5 piece silvered badge comprising the correct post 1902 Kings Crown Royal arms, Battle honours up to 1885 (Boer War honours not present) and ‘Angel Harp’ above banner ‘Fifth Royal Irish Lancers’. The Lance Cap is complete with original leather sweat band. The cap is approx UK size 6 1/2. The price for this impressive Lance Cap to a Prestigious Lancer’s Regiment includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:1
£3,950.00

Victorian Pre 1899, British 9th Queen’s Royal Lancer's Officer’s Lance Cap / Chapka By Cate & Co London With Gilt & Silvered Queen’s Crown Plate & Bullion Rosette With Black & White Swan’s Feather Plume. Sn 14666:2 - 14666:2
The 9th Queen's Royal Lancers was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army, first raised in 1715. It saw service for three centuries, including the First and Second World Wars. The Regiment survived the immediate post-war reduction in forces, but was amalgamated with the 12th Royal Lancers to form the 9th/12th Royal Lancers in 1960. The Regiment was formed by Major-General Owen Wynne as Owen Wynne's Regiment of Dragoons in Bedford in 1715 as part of the response to the Jacobite rising. The Regiment's first action was to attack the Jacobite forces in Wigan in late 1715. In 1717 the Regiment embarked for Ballinrobe, in Ireland, and was placed on the Irish establishment. The Regiment was ranked as the 9th Dragoons in 1719, re-titled as the 9th Regiment of Dragoons in 1751 and converted into Light Dragoons, becoming the 9th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons in 1783. The Regiment fought at the Battle of Kilcullen, inflicting severe losses on the rebels, on 24 May 1798 and at the Battle of Carlow on 25 May 1798, when they successfully ambushed the rebels, during the Irish Rebellion. The Regiment also saw action at the Battle of Vinegar Hill on 21 June 1798. The Regiment took part in Sir Samuel Auchmuty's disastrous expedition to the River Plate in October 1806, including the occupation of Montevideo in February 1807 during the Anglo-Spanish War. It then took part in the equally unsuccessful Walcheren Campaign in autumn 1809: a total of 152 men from the Regiment died of fever during that campaign. The Regiment then embarked for Portugal and fought at the Battle of Arroyo dos Molinos, capturing General De Brune of the French Army, in October 1811 during the Peninsular War. It was also part of the force involved in the Siege of Badajoz in March 1812. In April 1813, the Regiment returned to England. They were re-designated as a Lancer formation in 1816 and became the 9th (or Queen's Royal) Lancers in honour of Queen Adelaide in 1830 (Queen Adelaide was the Queen Consort of King Willianm IV and the Regiment was awarded the privilege of bearing her Royal Cypher). The Regiment was posted to India in 1842. It saw action at the Battle of Punniar in December 1843 during the Gwalior Campaign. It also fought at the Battle of Sobraon in February 1846 during the First Anglo-Sikh War and undertook a successful charge at the Battle of Gujrat in February 1849 during the Second Anglo-Sikh War. The Regiment then fought at the siege and capture of Delhi and the relief of Lucknow in summer 1857, as well as the capture of Lucknow in spring 1858 during the Indian Rebellion: the Regiment, which was described by the rebels as the Delhi Spearmen, was awarded twelve Victoria Crosses. The Regiment was renamed the 9th (The Queen's Royal) Lancers in 1861. The Regiment was posted to Afghanistan in 1878 and marched through the Khyber Pass in March 1879 as part of the Cavalry Brigade led by General Hugh Henry Gough. Following the murder of the British ambassador and his guards at Kabul in September 1879, the Regiment saw action at the Battle of Charasiab in October 1879. During the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The Commanding Officer of the Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Cleland, was killed while leading a charge at the Battle of Killa Kazi in December 1879. A Squadron from the Regiment took part in the Second Battle of Charasiab in April 1880 and the Regiment, as a whole, undertook the long march, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Henry Bushman, leading to the relief of Kandahar and defeat of Ayub Khan in September 1880. The Regiment saw much action in the Boer wars 1899-1902 and were involved in the Relief of Kimberley in winter 1899 and subsequent Battle of Paardeberg. Prior to WW1 the Regiment were awarded the following Battle Honours : Peninsula, Punniar, Sobraon, Chillianwallah, Goojerat, Punjaub, Delhi 1857, Lucknow, Charasiah, Kabul 1879, Kandahar 1880, Afghanistan 1878-80, Modder River, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, South Africa 1899-1902. This is a scarce, original, Cavalry Officer’s 1856 Pattern Lance Cap of the 9th Queen’s Royal Lancer's (see multiple entries including pages 18 & 63 to 66 in the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman which illustrates & describes head wear and badges of the 9th Royal / Queen’s Royal Lancers). The Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, skull and peak of black patent leather with correct gilt brass rope effect waist. The rear has the correct gilt metal ring & hook. The peak has a brass rim. The sides are covered in black facing cloth. Gilt brass piping with ornate finials extends down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct bullion rosette with Crown gilt button marked '9' (9th Lancers) and Lion’s head bosses with correct leather backed link gilt chain. It has a brass plume boss with dramatic black & white Swan’s Feather plume. The cap is fitted with the correct Victorian gilt metal rayed plate and gilt badge comprising the correct Queen’s Crown Royal arms, pre Boer War Battle honours and correct silvered Queen Adelaide Regina stylised ‘AR’ Royal Cypher above banner ‘Royal Lancers’. The cap is complete with original leather sweat band and silk liner which has a gold leaf maker’s or outfitters mark ‘Cater & Co London Established 1776’ (illustrated). The cap is approx UK size 6 1/2. The price for this impressive Lance Cap to a Prestigious Lancer’s Regiment includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:2
£3,750.00

Post 1902, British 9th Queen’s Royal Lancers Trooper’s Lance Cap / Chapka Kings Crown Plate, Rosette With Black & White Horse Hair Plume & Lines. Sn 14666:3 - 14666:3
The 9th Queen's Royal Lancers was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army, first raised in 1715. It saw service for three centuries, including the First and Second World Wars. The Regiment survived the immediate post-war reduction in forces, but was amalgamated with the 12th Royal Lancers to form the 9th/12th Royal Lancers in 1960. The Regiment was formed by Major-General Owen Wynne as Owen Wynne's Regiment of Dragoons in Bedford in 1715 as part of the response to the Jacobite rising. The Regiment's first action was to attack the Jacobite forces in Wigan in late 1715. In 1717 the Regiment embarked for Ballinrobe, in Ireland, and was placed on the Irish establishment. The Regiment was ranked as the 9th Dragoons in 1719, re-titled as the 9th Regiment of Dragoons in 1751 and converted into Light Dragoons, becoming the 9th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons in 1783. The Regiment fought at the Battle of Kilcullen, inflicting severe losses on the rebels, on 24 May 1798 and at the Battle of Carlow on 25 May 1798, when they successfully ambushed the rebels, during the Irish Rebellion. The Regiment also saw action at the Battle of Vinegar Hill on 21 June 1798. The Regiment took part in Sir Samuel Auchmuty's disastrous expedition to the River Plate in October 1806, including the occupation of Montevideo in February 1807 during the Anglo-Spanish War. It then took part in the equally unsuccessful Walcheren Campaign in autumn 1809: a total of 152 men from the Regiment died of fever during that campaign. The Regiment then embarked for Portugal and fought at the Battle of Arroyo dos Molinos, capturing General De Brune of the French Army, in October 1811 during the Peninsular War. It was also part of the force involved in the Siege of Badajoz in March 1812. In April 1813, the Regiment returned to England. They were re-designated as a Lancer formation in 1816 and became the 9th (or Queen's Royal) Lancers in honour of Queen Adelaide in 1830 (Queen Adelaide was the Queen Consort of King Willianm IV and the Regiment was awarded the privilege of bearing her Royal Cypher). The Regiment was posted to India in 1842. It saw action at the Battle of Punniar in December 1843 during the Gwalior Campaign. It also fought at the Battle of Sobraon in February 1846 during the First Anglo-Sikh War and undertook a successful charge at the Battle of Gujrat in February 1849 during the Second Anglo-Sikh War. The Regiment then fought at the siege and capture of Delhi and the relief of Lucknow in summer 1857, as well as the capture of Lucknow in spring 1858 during the Indian Rebellion: the Regiment, which was described by the rebels as the Delhi Spearmen, was awarded twelve Victoria Crosses. The Regiment was renamed the 9th (The Queen's Royal) Lancers in 1861. The Regiment was posted to Afghanistan in 1878 and marched through the Khyber Pass in March 1879 as part of the Cavalry Brigade led by General Hugh Henry Gough. Following the murder of the British ambassador and his guards at Kabul in September 1879, the Regiment saw action at the Battle of Charasiab in October 1879. During the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The Commanding Officer of the Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Cleland, was killed while leading a charge at the Battle of Killa Kazi in December 1879. A Squadron from the Regiment took part in the Second Battle of Charasiab in April 1880 and the Regiment, as a whole, undertook the long march, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Henry Bushman, leading to the relief of Kandahar and defeat of Ayub Khan in September 1880. The Regiment saw much action in the Boer wars 1899-1902 and were involved in the Relief of Kimberley in winter 1899 and subsequent Battle of Paardeberg. Prior to WW1 the Regiment were awarded the following Battle Honours : Peninsula, Punniar, Sobraon, Chillianwallah, Goojerat, Punjaub, Delhi 1857, Lucknow, Charasiah, Kabul 1879, Kandahar 1880, Afghanistan 1878-80, Modder River, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, South Africa 1899-1902. This is an original, Trooper’s Lance Cap of the 9th Queen’s Royal Lancer's (see multiple entries including pages 18 & 63 to 66 in the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman which illustrates & describes head wear and badges of the 9th Royal / Queen’s Royal Lancers). The Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, skull and peak of black patent leather with correct brass rope effect waist. The rear has the correct brass ring & hook. The sides are covered in black facing cloth. Brass piping with ornate finials extends down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct brass rosette with Crown and ‘9’ (9th Lancr’s) gilt button and Lion’s head bosses with correct leather backed link brass chain. It has a brass plume boss with black & white horse hair plume. The cap is fitted with original cord lines and correct rayed plate and badge comprising the King’s Crown Royal arms, Queen Adelaide ‘AR’ Royal cypher and Battle honours up to and including the Boer War above banner ‘Royal Lancers’. The cap is complete with original leather sweat band. The underside of the peak is stamped with numbers (illustrated). The cap is approx UK size 6 1/2. The price for this impressive Lance Cap to a Prestigious Lancer’s Regiment includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:3
£1,695.00

Post 1902 British 9th Queen’s Royal Lancers Trooper’s Lance Cap / Chapka Kings Crown Plate, KC Rosette With Black & White Horse Hair Plume. Sn 14666:4 - 14666:4
The 9th Queen's Royal Lancers was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army, first raised in 1715. It saw service for three centuries, including the First and Second World Wars. The Regiment survived the immediate post-war reduction in forces, but was amalgamated with the 12th Royal Lancers to form the 9th/12th Royal Lancers in 1960. The Regiment was formed by Major-General Owen Wynne as Owen Wynne's Regiment of Dragoons in Bedford in 1715 as part of the response to the Jacobite rising. The Regiment's first action was to attack the Jacobite forces in Wigan in late 1715. In 1717 the Regiment embarked for Ballinrobe, in Ireland, and was placed on the Irish establishment. The Regiment was ranked as the 9th Dragoons in 1719, re-titled as the 9th Regiment of Dragoons in 1751 and converted into Light Dragoons, becoming the 9th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons in 1783. The Regiment fought at the Battle of Kilcullen, inflicting severe losses on the rebels, on 24 May 1798 and at the Battle of Carlow on 25 May 1798, when they successfully ambushed the rebels, during the Irish Rebellion. The Regiment also saw action at the Battle of Vinegar Hill on 21 June 1798. The Regiment took part in Sir Samuel Auchmuty's disastrous expedition to the River Plate in October 1806, including the occupation of Montevideo in February 1807 during the Anglo-Spanish War. It then took part in the equally unsuccessful Walcheren Campaign in autumn 1809: a total of 152 men from the Regiment died of fever during that campaign. The Regiment then embarked for Portugal and fought at the Battle of Arroyo dos Molinos, capturing General De Brune of the French Army, in October 1811 during the Peninsular War. It was also part of the force involved in the Siege of Badajoz in March 1812. In April 1813, the Regiment returned to England. They were re-designated as a Lancer formation in 1816 and became the 9th (or Queen's Royal) Lancers in honour of Queen Adelaide in 1830 (Queen Adelaide was the Queen Consort of King Willianm IV and the Regiment was awarded the privilege of bearing her Royal Cypher). The Regiment was posted to India in 1842. It saw action at the Battle of Punniar in December 1843 during the Gwalior Campaign. It also fought at the Battle of Sobraon in February 1846 during the First Anglo-Sikh War and undertook a successful charge at the Battle of Gujrat in February 1849 during the Second Anglo-Sikh War. The Regiment then fought at the siege and capture of Delhi and the relief of Lucknow in summer 1857, as well as the capture of Lucknow in spring 1858 during the Indian Rebellion: the Regiment, which was described by the rebels as the Delhi Spearmen, was awarded twelve Victoria Crosses. The Regiment was renamed the 9th (The Queen's Royal) Lancers in 1861. The Regiment was posted to Afghanistan in 1878 and marched through the Khyber Pass in March 1879 as part of the Cavalry Brigade led by General Hugh Henry Gough. Following the murder of the British ambassador and his guards at Kabul in September 1879, the Regiment saw action at the Battle of Charasiab in October 1879. During the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The Commanding Officer of the Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Cleland, was killed while leading a charge at the Battle of Killa Kazi in December 1879. A Squadron from the Regiment took part in the Second Battle of Charasiab in April 1880 and the Regiment, as a whole, undertook the long march, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Henry Bushman, leading to the relief of Kandahar and defeat of Ayub Khan in September 1880. The Regiment saw much action in the Boer wars 1899-1902 and were involved in the Relief of Kimberley in winter 1899 and subsequent Battle of Paardeberg. Prior to WW1 the Regiment were awarded the following Battle Honours : Peninsula, Punniar, Sobraon, Chillianwallah, Goojerat, Punjaub, Delhi 1857, Lucknow, Charasiah, Kabul 1879, Kandahar 1880, Afghanistan 1878-80, Modder River, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, South Africa 1899-1902. This is an original, Trooper’s Lance Cap of the 9th Queen’s Royal Lancer's (see multiple entries including pages 18 & 63 to 66 in the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman which illustrates & describes head wear and badges of the 9th Royal / Queen’s Royal Lancers). The Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, skull and peak of black patent leather with correct brass rope effect waist. The rear has the correct brass ring & hook. The sides are covered in black facing cloth. Brass piping with ornate finials extends down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct brass rosette with Crown and ‘9’ (9th Lancer’s) brass button and Lion’s head bosses with correct leather backed link brass chain. It has a brass plume boss with black & white horse hair plume. The cap is fitted with correct rayed plate and badge comprising the King’s Crown Royal arms, Queen Adelaide ‘AR’ Royal cypher and Battle honours up to and including the Boer War above banner ‘Royal Lancers’. The cap is complete with original leather sweat band. The cap is approx UK size 6 1/2. The price for this Trooper’s Lance Cap to a Prestigious Lancer’s Regiment includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:4
£1,475.00

Victorian, British 12th (The Prince of Wales's) Royal Regiment of Lancers.Trooper’s Lance Cap / Chapka, Queens Crown Plate With Pre 1899 Battle Honours, Rosette With Scarlet Horse Hair Plume & Lines. Sn 14666:5 - 14666:5
The 12th (The Prince of Wales's) Royal Regiment of Lancers, was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army first formed in 1715. It saw service for three centuries, including the First World War and the Second World War. The Regiment survived the immediate post-war reduction in forces, but was amalgamated with the 9th Queen's Royal Lancers to form the 9th/12th Royal Lancers (Prince of Wales's) in 1960. The Regiment of Dragoons was raised in Reading by Brigadier-General Phineas Bowles as the Phineas Bowles's Regiment of Dragoons in July 1715 as part of the response to the Jacobite rebellion. In 1718, the Regiment was placed on the Irish establishment and posted to Ireland, where it remained for 75 years. In 1751, the Regiment was officially styled the 12th Dragoons. In 1768, King George III bestowed the badge of the three ostrich feathers and the motto "Ich Dien" on the regiment and re-titled it as The 12th (Prince of Wales's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons. A young Arthur Wellesley joined the Regiment as a subaltern in 1789. The Regiment took part in the Siege of Bastia in April 1794, which took place in Corsica, during the French Revolutionary Wars. Pope Pius VI was impressed by the conduct of the Regiment and ordered that medals be awarded to its officers. The Regiment landed at Alexandria in March 1801 and saw action at the Battle of Alexandria later in the month. The Regiment, captured 28 officers and 570 other ranks of the French Dromedary Regiment in an action in the Egyptian desert in May 1801. It took part in the Siege of Cairo securing the city in June 1801 and then participated in the Siege of Alexandria taking that city in September 1801. The Regiment next deployed for the disastrous Walcheren Campaign in autumn 1809. In June 1811 the Regiment embarked for Lisbon and took part in the Siege of Ciudad Rodrigo in January 1812, the Siege of Badajoz in March 1812 and the Battle of Villagarcia in April 1812 during the Peninsular War. It also undertook two charges at the Battle of Salamanca in July 1812 before taking part in the Siege of Burgos in September 1812,the Battle of Vitoria in June 1813 and the Siege of San Sebastián in autumn 1813. The Regiment next advanced into France and supported the infantry at the Battle of Nivelle in November 1813. During the Waterloo Campaign, the Regiment was attached to Sir John Vandeleur's Light Cavalry Brigade. At the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815, the Regiment charged down the slope to support the Union Brigade of Medium Cavalry. In 1816, the 12th Light Dragoons was armed with Lances after the Cavalry of Napoleon's Army had shown their effectiveness at Waterloo and were re-titled 12th (The Prince of Wales's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons (Lancers). In 1855, it reinforced the Light Cavalry Brigade in the Crimea after the Charge of the Light Brigade at the Battle of Balaclava. In 1861, the Regiment was renamed 12th (The Prince of Wales's) Royal Regiment of Lancers. The Regiment was stationed in India between 1857 and 1860 in response to the Indian Rebellion and in Ireland from 1865 to 1870, before fighting in the Second Anglo-Afghan War in the late 1870s. The Regiment went on to serve and see action in the Boer wars 1899-1902, WW1 and WW2. Prior to the Boer Wars the Regiment was awarded the following Battle Honours: Egypt, Salamanca, Peninsula, Waterloo, South Africa 1851-2-3, Sevastopol, Central India. This is an original, Victorian Trooper’s Lance Cap of the 12th (The Prince of Wales's) Royal Regiment of Lancers (see multiple entries including pages 13, 19,128 & 129 in the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman which illustrates & describes head wear and badges as worn by the 12th Lancers). The Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, skull and peak of black patent leather with correct yellow and black cloth waistband. The rear has the correct brass ring & hook. The sides are covered in scarlet facing cloth. Yellow twisted rope piping with ornate brass finials extends down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct green & yellow wool ball rosette with Crown and ‘12’ (12th Lancers) gilt button and Lion’s head bosses with correct leather backed link brass chain. It has a brass plume boss with correct scarlet horse hair plume. The cap is fitted with original cord lines and correct rayed plate and badge comprising the Queen’s Crown Royal arms, Prince of Wales Feathers and pre Boer War Battle honour banners together with Sphinx on plinth Egypt Honour. The cap is complete with original leather sweat band liner. The crown of the inside of the cap has a partially visible ink stamp and the sweatband contemporary white painted numbers (all illustrated inset in image 2). The cap is approx UK size 6 1/2. The price for this impressive Lance Cap to a Prestigious Lancer’s Regiment includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:5
£1,575.00

Victorian, British WD 12th (The Prince of Wales's) Royal Regiment of Lancers.Trooper’s Lance Cap / Chapka, Queens Crown Plate With Pre 1899 Battle Honours, Rosette With Scarlet Horse Hair Plume & Lines. Sn 14666:6 - 14666:6
The 12th (The Prince of Wales's) Royal Regiment of Lancers, was a Cavalry Regiment of the British Army first formed in 1715. It saw service for three centuries, including the First World War and the Second World War. The Regiment survived the immediate post-war reduction in forces, but was amalgamated with the 9th Queen's Royal Lancers to form the 9th/12th Royal Lancers (Prince of Wales's) in 1960. The Regiment of Dragoons was raised in Reading by Brigadier-General Phineas Bowles as the Phineas Bowles's Regiment of Dragoons in July 1715 as part of the response to the Jacobite rebellion. In 1718, the Regiment was placed on the Irish establishment and posted to Ireland, where it remained for 75 years. In 1751, the Regiment was officially styled the 12th Dragoons. In 1768, King George III bestowed the badge of the three ostrich feathers and the motto "Ich Dien" on the regiment and re-titled it as The 12th (Prince of Wales's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons. A young Arthur Wellesley joined the Regiment as a subaltern in 1789. The Regiment took part in the Siege of Bastia in April 1794, which took place in Corsica, during the French Revolutionary Wars. Pope Pius VI was impressed by the conduct of the Regiment and ordered that medals be awarded to its officers. The Regiment landed at Alexandria in March 1801 and saw action at the Battle of Alexandria later in the month. The Regiment, captured 28 officers and 570 other ranks of the French Dromedary Regiment in an action in the Egyptian desert in May 1801. It took part in the Siege of Cairo securing the city in June 1801 and then participated in the Siege of Alexandria taking that city in September 1801. The Regiment next deployed for the disastrous Walcheren Campaign in autumn 1809. In June 1811 the Regiment embarked for Lisbon and took part in the Siege of Ciudad Rodrigo in January 1812, the Siege of Badajoz in March 1812 and the Battle of Villagarcia in April 1812 during the Peninsular War. It also undertook two charges at the Battle of Salamanca in July 1812 before taking part in the Siege of Burgos in September 1812,the Battle of Vitoria in June 1813 and the Siege of San Sebastián in autumn 1813. The Regiment next advanced into France and supported the infantry at the Battle of Nivelle in November 1813. During the Waterloo Campaign, the Regiment was attached to Sir John Vandeleur's Light Cavalry Brigade. At the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815, the Regiment charged down the slope to support the Union Brigade of Medium Cavalry. In 1816, the 12th Light Dragoons was armed with Lances after the Cavalry of Napoleon's Army had shown their effectiveness at Waterloo and were re-titled 12th (The Prince of Wales's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons (Lancers). In 1855, it reinforced the Light Cavalry Brigade in the Crimea after the Charge of the Light Brigade at the Battle of Balaclava. In 1861, the Regiment was renamed 12th (The Prince of Wales's) Royal Regiment of Lancers. The Regiment was stationed in India between 1857 and 1860 in response to the Indian Rebellion and in Ireland from 1865 to 1870, before fighting in the Second Anglo-Afghan War in the late 1870s. The Regiment went on to serve and see action in the Boer wars 1899-1902, WW1 and WW2. Prior to the Boer Wars the Regiment was awarded the following Battle Honours: Egypt, Salamanca, Peninsula, Waterloo, South Africa 1851-2-3, Sevastopol, Central India. This is an original, Victorian Trooper’s Lance Cap of the 12th (The Prince of Wales's) Royal Regiment of Lancers (see multiple entries including pages 13, 19,128 & 129 in the book ‘Head Dress Of The British Lancer’s 1816 To The Present’ by Rowe & Carman which illustrates & describes head wear and badges as worn by the 12th Lancers). The Lance Cap has the correct internal construction, skull and peak of black patent leather with correct yellow and black cloth waistband. The rear has the correct brass ring & hook. The sides are covered in scarlet facing cloth. Yellow twisted rope piping with ornate brass finials extends down the 4 angles. The cap has the correct green & yellow wool ball rosette with Crown and ‘12’ (12th Lancers) gilt button and Lion’s head bosses with correct leather backed link brass chain. It has a brass plume boss with correct scarlet horse hair plume. The cap is fitted with original cord lines and correct rayed plate and badge comprising the Queen’s Crown Royal arms, Prince of Wales Feathers and pre Boer War Battle honour banners together with Sphinx on plinth Egypt Honour. The cap is complete with original leather sweat band liner. The crown of the inside of the cap has a partially visible ink stamp and WD arrow mark (all illustrated inset in image 2). The cap is approx UK size 6 1/2. The price for this impressive Lance Cap to a Prestigious Lancer’s Regiment includes UK delivery. Sn 14666:6
£1,575.00
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