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SOLD SOLD SOLD MUSEUM QUALITY, Victorian Hand Crafted African Zulu Chief’s Wire Bound Tropical Hard Wood Knobkerrie / War Club. Sn 14341 - 14341
A superb, original, 19th Century Zulu Chief’s knobkerrie. Knobkerrie, also spelled knopkierie or knobkerry, are clubs used mainly in Southern and Eastern Africa. Typically they have a large knob at one end and can be used for throwing at animals in hunting or for clubbing an enemy's head. This knobkerrie is hand crafted from a tropical hard wood to form the knob and create the shaft. The club measures 30” in length. The bulbous ‘hammer’ head is 3” diameter & would create devastating injuries if used as a weapon. The shaft has 4 sections of intricate heavy metal wire binding which appears to be a combination of iron and copper. The price for this museum quality piece includes delivery. Sn 14341
£0.00

19th Century Authentic Large Fighting Knife / Axe of the Mangbetu Tribe of Central Africa with Ivory Grip. Sn 14318 - 14318
A 19th Century authentic original fighting knife / axe of the Mangbetu people residing in Central Africa. The Mangbetu stood out to European explorers because of their elongated heads. Traditionally, babies' heads were wrapped tightly with cloth in order to give them this distinctive appearance. The practice, called Lipombo, began dying out in the 1950s with the arrival of more Europeans and westernisation. The Mangbetu are known for their highly developed art and music. One instrument associated with and named after them is the Mangbetu harp or guitar. Many recent studies feature the Mangbetu as a historically cannibalistic people. According to Mangbetu men interviewed in the documentary Spirits of Defiance: The Mangbetu People of Zaire it appears that many Mangbetu currently believe their ancestors to have practiced cannibalism. The knife was originally used as a weapon of war and also as an agricultural implement, but later on developed into a luxury item and a symbol of status and authority. This one is a 19th century one with a large sickle shaped blade. It measures 10 1/2" (point to point diagonally) and 15 1/4" overall from top to bottom. It is very nicely forged. The original blackening of the steel with the polished edges is maintained. There are three holes in the blade. It has a one piece ivory grip with very good yellowish age patina. The grip is secure. Sn 14318
£475.00

Victorian Era Zulu Warrior’s Wire Bound Tropical Hard Wood Assegai Stabbing Spear With Remnants Of Original Cow Hide Cover. Sn 14167 - 14167
The Assegai is a short handled stabbing spear invented by the legendary Zulu king Shaka in the early 1800s. The weapon revolutionized tribal warfare in Southern Africa. This Assegai measures 49 ½” overall length. It’s iron 5 ¼” long elegant leaf shaped blade has a round 7 ½” tang securely attached to its hand crafted tropical hard wood shaft by intricate iron wire binding. The bottom end of the shaft has a ½” section of iron wire binding and an 11” section of its original cow hide covering which is worn consistent with age and use. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 14167
£450.00

Victorian Hand Crafted African Zulu Warrior’s Wire Bound Tropical Hard Wood Knobkerrie / War Club. Sn 14164 - 14164
A 19th Century Zulu Warrior’s knobkerrie. Knobkerrie, also spelled knopkierie or knobkerry, are clubs used mainly in Southern and Eastern Africa. Typically they have a large knob at one end and can be used for throwing at animals in hunting or for clubbing an enemy's head. This knobkerrie is hand crafted from a tropical hard wood to form the knob and create the shaft. The club measures 21 ½” in length. The bulbous ‘hammer’ head is 3 ¼” diameter & would create devastating injuries if used as a weapon. The shaft has two 4 ¼” long sections of intricate heavy metal wire binding which appears to be a combination of iron and copper. The bottom end of the shaft is holed and fitted with 2 ¾” diameter iron ring for hanging from a shield or waist cord or fitting of a wrist cord. The price includes delivery. Sn 14164
£575.00

SOLD SOLD SOLD (LAY-AWAY) Victorian Hand Crafted African Zulu Warrior Chief’s Tropical Hard Wood Symbol Of Seniority / Knobkerrie Made From The Heart Wood (Strongest Part) In Twisted Wood Form Later Made Into A Gentleman’s Walking Stick. Sn 14004 - 14004
A Circa 19th Century Zulu Warrior Chief’s knobkerrie war club / symbol of authority, seniority or rank. These were used mainly in Southern and Eastern Africa. Typically they have a large knob at one end and can be used for throwing at animals in hunting or for clubbing an enemy's head and the symbol of rank is denoted by the twisted branch form of the shaft. This knobkierie is hand crafted from the ‘heart wood’ (strongest part of the tree) of a tropical hard wood tree to form the knob and crafted to create the twisted form shaft. The club measures 33 ¼” in length. The bulbous ‘hammer’ head is 1 ½” diameter. The well defined heart wood can clearly be seen in image 2. The polished shaft and hammer head are in excellent condition, free of damage. At some point in its life a conical brass cap has been mounted on the end of the shaft to create a gentleman’s walking stick. The price includes delivery. Sn 14004
£0.00

Early 1900's African Masai Lion Spear With Long 54cm Leaf Shaped Blade With Raised Medial Ridge , Short Central Haft And Spike Butt. Sn 13653 - 13653
Early 1900's African Masai Lion stabbing spear with 54cm long steel leaf shaped blade (73" overall length) weighing 1.9 kg. A spear is a pole weapon used for stabbing with iron or fire-hardened tip. The use of various types of the spear was widespread all over Africa and it was the most common weapon used before the introduction of firearms. The Zulu and other Nguni tribes of South Africa were renowned for their use of the spear. The spear was not only the most commonest weapon in Africa but was also used as a form of currency, tribes smelting iron spear heads traded the spear heads to their less skilful neighbours. This weapon has a 54 mm (21 1/4") long blade with a medial ridge along it's length, it is 33" including the socket for the haft. It has a short central 6" visible haft and a further iron 33" stabbing pike butt. The iron blade and spike are 'forced fit' onto the haft. The haft is plain hard wood and has been hand worked with a linear pattern. This is a very nice example. (See 'A Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and Use of Arms and Armour in all Countries and in All Times' book by George Cameron Stone, Pages 572-573). The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13653
£275.00

Early 1900's African Masai Lion Spear With Long 78mm Blade With Raised Medial Ridge , Short Central Haft And Spike Butt. Sn 13652 - 13652
Early 1900's African Masai Lion stabbing spear with 78mm long steel blade (74" overall length) weighing 1.7 kg. A spear is a pole weapon used for stabbing with iron or fire-hardened tip. The use of various types of the spear was widespread all over Africa and it was the most common weapon used before the introduction of firearms. The Zulu and other Nguni tribes of South Africa were renowned for their use of the spear. The spear was not only the most commonest weapon in Africa but was also used as a form of currency, tribes smelting iron spear heads traded the spear heads to their less skilful neighbours. This weapon has a 78 cm (30 3/4") long blade with a medial ridge along it's length, it is 37" including the socket for the haft. It has a short central 7" visible haft and a further iron 30" stabbing pike butt. The iron blade and spike are 'forced fit' onto the haft. The haft is plain hard wood. This is a very nice example. (See 'A Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and Use of Arms and Armour in all Countries and in All Times' book by George Cameron Stone, Pages 572-573). The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13652
£275.00

Early 1900's African Throwing Spear With Leaf Blade and 43" Dark Patina Haft. Sn 13651 - 13651
Early 1900's African throwing spear with leaf blade and 47" dark patina haft. An assegai is a pole weapon used for throwing, usually a light spear or javelin made of wood and pointed with iron or fire-hardened tip. The use of various types of the assegai was widespread all over Africa and it was the most common weapon used before the introduction of firearms. The Zulu and other Nguni tribes of South Africa were renowned for their use of the assegai. This weapon has a 6" leaf shaped blade with a medial ridge along it's length. The blade is secured with tightly wrapped reed. The shaft is 47" long and has a very nice dark patina. This is a very nice example. (See 'A Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and Use of Arms and Armour in all Countries and in All Times' book by George Cameron Stone, Pages 572-573). The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13651
£175.00

Early 1900's African Throwing Spear With Leaf Blade and 43" Dark Patina Haft. Sn 13650 - 13650
Early 1900's African throwing spear with leaf blade and 43" dark patina haft. An assegai is a pole weapon used for throwing, usually a light spear or javelin made of wood and pointed with iron or fire-hardened tip. The use of various types of the assegai was widespread all over Africa and it was the most common weapon used before the introduction of firearms. The Zulu and other Nguni tribes of South Africa were renowned for their use of the assegai. This weapon has a 7" leaf shaped blade with a medial ridge along it's length. It also has 5" of steel visible shaft. The shaft with blade is secured with tightly wrapped reed. The shaft is 43" long and has a very nice dark patina. This is a very nice example. (See 'A Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and Use of Arms and Armour in all Countries and in All Times' book by George Cameron Stone, Pages 572-573). The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13650
£175.00

A Lifetime Collection Of Approximately 100 Knapped Flints In An Oak Glazed Table Top Display Case. Sn 13654 - 13654
This is a lifetime collection of approximately 100 knapped flints in an oak glazed table top display case. The case measures 24" x 14" x 5" and the sides are dovetailed. This collection is very well presented in a very nicely made oak glazed table top display case. Flint has been used for the raw material for tools longer than any other material and it does not decay. It is very hard but is easily flaked and produces razor sharp flakes, unfortunately it is slightly porous so that it can be flaked by thermal action (the action of frost and heat), but luckily for archaeologists when it has been struck by man there are distinctive features that help with identification. Flint was formed in the chalk deposits in S England, 70 to 100 million years ago water percolated through the chalk and dissolved the silicon molecules within the chalk. Over the years the silica built up to form layers or nodules of flint. The silica frequently grew around a fossil and this produced the curious shaped nodules. The case bottom is lined with white cotton and the various types of flints are laid out for display. The flints all vary in size and types including points, knives, skin scrapers and axe heads. They are from various countries, mainly European and some North American Indian. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13654
£395.00
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