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Aeronautica

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WW2 Royal Air Force 'Bakelite' Recognition Model of a German Heinkel HE III MK V. Sn 13246:1 - 13246:1
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Bakelite model of a German Heinkel HE III MK V and is finished in matt black. If there was an aircraft that had done more damage regarding strategic bombing during the Battle of Britain, it was the Heinkel He 111. The Heinkel He 111 was a German aircraft designed by Siegfried and Walter Günter at Heinkel Flugzeugwerke in 1934. Through development it was described as a "wolf in sheep's clothing" because the project masqueraded the machine as civilian transport, though from conception the Heinkel was intended to provide the nascent Luftwaffe with a fast medium bomber. Perhaps the best-recognised German bomber due to the distinctive, extensively glazed "greenhouse" nose of later versions, the Heinkel He 111 was the most numerous Luftwaffe bomber during the early stages of World War II. The bomber fared well until the Battle of Britain, when its weak defensive armament was exposed. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Royal Observer Corps as ground gun crews and observers also needed to positively identify enemy aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers. On the bottom it has a moulded "HE III MK V". It measures 13" wingspan. There is a small drilled hole through the centre of the fuselage which was to thread cord through to hang the model from the ceiling to replicate the model in flight. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13246:1
£275.00

WW2 Royal Air Force & Royal Observer Corps 'Bakelite' Recognition Model of a Boulton Paul Defiant. Sn 13248 - 13248
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Bakelite model of a Bolton Paul Defiant and is finished in matt black. The Boulton Paul Defiant was a British interceptor aircraft that served with the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. The Defiant was designed and built by Boulton Paul Aircraft as a "turret fighter", without any forward-firing guns. It was a contemporary of the Royal Navy's Blackburn Roc. The concept of a turret fighter related directly to the successful First World War era Bristol F.2 Fighter. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Army as ground gun crews also needed to positively identify enemy aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers. On the bottom it has the word "Defiant" moulded on the underside. It measures 6 3/4" wingspan. There is a small drilled hole through the centre of the fuselage which was to thread cord through to hang the model from the ceiling to replicate the model in flight. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13248
£165.00

WW2 Royal Air Force & Royal Observer Corps 'Bakelite' Recognition Model of a Fairey Fulmar. Sn 13250:1 - 13250:1
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Bakelite model of a Fairey Fulmar and is finished in matt black. The Fairey Fulmar was a British carrier-borne fighter aircraft that served with the Fleet Air Arm (FAA) during the Second World War. A total of 600 were built by Fairey Aviation at its Stockport factory between January 1940 and December 1942. The Fulmar's design was based on that of the earlier Fairey P.4/34 that was in turn developed in 1936 as a replacement for the Fairey Battle light bomber. Although its performance (like that of its Battle antecedent) was lacking, the Fulmar was a reliable, sturdy aircraft with long range and an effective armament of eight machine guns. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Army as ground gun crews also needed to positively identify enemy aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers. On the bottom it has the word "Fulmar" moulded on the underside. It measures 8" wingspan. There is a small drilled hole through the centre of the fuselage which was to thread cord through to hang the model from the ceiling to replicate the model in flight. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13250:1
£175.00

WW2 Royal Air Force & Royal Observer Corps 'Bakelite' Recognition Model of a German Junkers 88. Sn 13246 - 13246
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Bakelite model of a German Junkers 88 and is finished in matt black. The Junkers Ju 88 was a German World War II Luftwaffe twin-engined multirole combat aircraft. Designed by Junkers Flugzeug- und Motorenwerke in the mid-1930s. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Army as ground gun crews also needed to positively identify enemy aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers. On the bottom it has a moulded "JU 88". It measures 10" wingspan. There is a small drilled hole through the centre of the fuselage which was to thread cord through to hang the model from the ceiling to replicate the model in flight. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13246
£225.00

Scarce WW2 Royal Air Force & Royal Observer Corps 'Buckram' Recognition Model of a Short Sterling. Sn 13252 - 13252
During WW2, from late 1940, models were used extensively in aircraft recognition training programs. Models were of prime importance not only for their versatility in teaching but, as with enemy aircraft, they were often the only subjects ready available for the camera. Most of these models were made of wood, but also Bakelite and Buckram (a cloth like material mixed with a binder and pressed into a mould similar to a water-based version of ‘glass-fibre’ resin moulding) was being used. They were usually produced in 1/72 scale following the lead already set by the Sky Birds and Penguin models. Compared to the Penguins they were crude and less detailed, but that was satisfactory for identification purposes. They were usually painted in matt-black or matt-grey, an appropriate colour, as a real aircraft would appear in this manner when viewed from a distance. This is a Buckram made model of a Short Sterling and is finished in matt black. The Short Stirling was the first four-engined British heavy bomber of World War II. The model would have been used by both RAF and the Army as the Air Observer Corps and gun crews also needed to positively identify friendly aircraft from a distance. Typically seen in films hanging in aircrew rooms and briefing rooms. These models didn't survive in great numbers and as such this buckram model is scarce. On the bottom it has a sticker saying "Stirling" and a white painted "Mall 3". It measures 16" wingspan. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 13252
£245.00

WW2 C1943 British RAF 1st Pattern Type E Airtex Lightweight Coastal Command / Tropical / Desert Unwired Air Crew Flying Helmet With Very Early ‘Bennett’ Buckles. Sn 12823 - 12823
These 1st type flying helmets were introduced in 1943. Their RAF Stores code was 22C/744-747 (see page 18 of the book ‘Luftwaffe vs RAF’ by Prodger). Made of lightweight beige coloured airtex material the helmets were used by RAF Desert/ Tropical and coastal command air crews. This example is clean and has the correct very early ‘Bennett’ buckles. . The rubber ear cups for comms are marked ‘10A/2266, All material is undamaged with just the service wear to be expected and all leather straps are present. There are no visible manufacturer, WD or date marks. The helmet is approx. UK size 6 ½. Price includes UK delivery. Sn 12823
£295.00

WW2 Royal Air Force Type 'C' Leather Flying Helmet Size 7 Re Wired For Use In A Vulcan Bomber in the 60's. Sn 12824 - 12824
An Air Ministry WW2 'C' Type leather flying helmet which has been re wired for use in a Vulcan bomber. This Air Ministry issue type 'C' helmet was used in fighter aircraft and the pilot then converted to Vulcan bombers where the official issue was a Gentrex type helmet which was found to be too restrictive in the confines of the Vulcan cockpit and so this Type 'C' helmet was officially re wired to allow it's use in the Vulcan bomber. The helmet leather is very supple and is in excellent condition. It is sized inside on the left at "7". On the outside on the left it is ink stamped with the War Department 'Broad Arrow' and "22C 10684". (see the insert photograph). All straps and buckles are present and in good matching order. The ear phone cups are in good condition and have labels on the outside with "A M 10A/13466" on. The elasticated chin strap retains it's elasticity. The interior of the helmet shows light use. The wire going into the helmet has an over sleeve with "Cord Assembly" and "5995-99-112-7125" in white lettering. It has a rubberised plug which fits into a rubberised socket which has pink sleeves with "R40 6M4R15277A/1 Mod459 JA60 R49" in black lettering on. In all a very nice condition complete helmet, becoming harder to find especially in this condition. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 12824
£245.00

Royal Air Force 'C' Type Leather Flying Helmet Size 7 - 7 1/4" & A Pair Of Flying Goggles. Sn 123755 - 12375
An Air Ministry 'C' type leather flying helmet and a pair of leather Flying Goggles. The helmet leather is in a very supple condition and is in excellent condition. It is sized inside on the left at "7-7 1/4". All straps and buckles are present and in good matching order. The ear phone cups are in good condition and wired up to an original period Bakelite plug. The interior of the helmet shows light use. In all a very nice condition complete helmet, becoming harder to find especially in this condition. The leather Flying Goggles are in very good condition, the right hand lenses has a small crack in it. The elasticated head band has lost some of its elasticity. The buckles and adjusters are all present. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 12375
£445.00

WW2 Battle Of Britain Royal Air Force 'B' Type Leather Flying Helmet By Frank Bryan Dated 1938, Size 6 1/2" - 6 3/4" & A Pair Of MK VIII Flying Goggles. Sn 12374 - 12374
A superb WW2 Battle Of Britain era, un - touched condition Air Ministry 'B' type flying helmet, complete with large style maker label and a pair of leather MK VIII Flying Goggles. The helmet leather is in a very supple condition, showing very light honest service use only, and now appearing dark tan / brown in colour. It is sized inside on a label to 6 1/2" - 6 3/4". All straps and buckles are present and in good matching order. The ear cup zips are in good working order. The interior of helmet shows light use, wear and sweat staining. It has a silk maker label present giving details "Size 16 1/2 to 6 3/4 AM Made By Frank Bryan Limited London & Worcester 1938". Above this it is ink stamped "ALD 5 B1" inside a black rectangle. In all a stunning helmet, becoming harder to find especially in this condition. The archetypal WW2 RAF flying helmet, much used during the ’Battle of Britain’. The leather MK VIII Flying Goggles are in excellent condition, the lenses are in very good undamaged condition. The leather nose cover is stamped with MK VII 220/930 1 4260" and a white stamp "B L B H 1" inside a circle. The elasticated head band has lost some of its elasticity. The buckles and adjusters are all present. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 12374
£745.00

British R.A.F. Flying Helmet 'Bonedome' MK. 3A Complete with Visor, Headset, Mic and Issue Storage/Carry Box. Sn 11601 - 11601
A British R.A.F. Jet Pilots Flying Helmet known as a 'Bonedome'. The Mk. 3A flying helmets were Royal Air Force issue from the early 1970`s and superseded the G-Type/Mk.1A combination and Mk.2 and 2A flying helmets. They were used by all front line pilots flying rotary & fixed wing aircraft, this included subsonic & supersonic aircraft, everything from early Hunters to Lightning's. The Mk.3A was fitted with a boom mike for helicopter and light aircraft applications and Mk.3B had Oxygen-Mask hooks for use with the P/Q-Type oxygen-mask, both have the same internal specifications as the Mk.3C flying helmet. The Mk.3A/B helmet has a single visor which locks in various positions on the centre rail, these visors were issued in various tints from clear to dark tinted and were eventually superseded by the twin visor Mk.3C helmet. This flying helmet is complete with an anti-glare visor, cloth cover, headsets, microphone boom and the original issue hard storage/carry case. The case is in excellent condition and has a label on the front "Helmet MK 2A Size Medium Stores Reference 22c/1253129" On the top it has a further label with "12196". It has a plastic carry handle on the front. The lid is secured with two suitcase type locks. Inside the box it is foam lined, shaped to take the helmet and it has two elasticated straps that secure the helmet in the box. Inside the lid it has a glasses size wallet and clear plastic name pocket. The shaped foam pieces also carry the stores number and the War Department 'Broad Arrow'. The box is in excellent condition. The helmet is in very good condition, some of the foam lining inside has degraded slightly with wear. It is complete with headsets and a Microphone boom. It has a nylon webbing suspension system fitted inside to give a comfortable fit. An anti-glare visor is fitted, comprising a centre rail attachment and mechanism and a tinted acrylic anti-glare screen which is in perfect unmarked condition. It comes with an elasticated cloth cover. The rail is stamped "Anti Glare anti Blast MK 2 Medium". It has the white paint finish with reflective "Solas-A" cross on the top. It is in good condition. The leather edge roll is good and the lining is very clean. The visor track mechanism is in working order. This price includes UK delivery. Sn 11601
£895.00
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